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2016 RULE BOOK

 

APB / BIO RULE BOOK 2016

 

 

 

ACN: 604 416 177

 

Email: biolimited@yahoo.com.au
www.apbtour.com

© Bodyboarding International Officials Limited, 2016

All rights reserved.

No part of this book may be reproduced in any form

without the express permission, obtained in writing,

from Bodyboarding International Officials Limited.
Bodyboarding International Officials Limited is

a registered non-profit organisation.

 

This Rule Book is written for the Association of Professional Bodyboarders (APB) World Tour 2016.

 

Acknowledgements:

 

BIO Limited thanks the following people for their

direct contribution to the APB/BIO Rule Book:

Author, Designer & Editor:                    Karl Gol (CEO/Secretary/Director- BIO Limited, APB Judge)

Additional Editors:                                Craig Hadden (Managing Director – BIO Limited,           Technical Director – APB World Tour).

Chico Garritano (Director – BIO Limited; Head Judge – APB

World Tour)

Clayton Pickworth (Director – BIO Limited, APB Judge)

Alex Leon (CEO – APB World Tour)

Tom Wilson (Business Development Manager – APB World Tour)

Terry McKenna (Operations Manager – APB World Tour)

 

 

 

 

CONTENTS

Page

1.0          THE APB WORLD TOUR                               6

1.1            APB World Tour Sanction Fees and                          6

Licensing

1 .2                                 Prizemoney                                                                      7

1 .3                                 Scheduling of Events                                                     9

1.4            APB World Tour Event Status                     10

1.5         APB Membership and Fees                            11

1 .6                                 Trials and Specialty Events                         13

1 .7                                 Event Window Periods                                               13

1 .8                                                                     Contest Days and Lay Days                                     14

1 .9 Mobile Events and Alternate                                      15

Locations

1.10             Insurance and Permits                                 15

1 .11                             Event Formats                                                              16

1 .12                             Event Seeding – General Seeding               16

Order and Replacement Rules

1 .13                 Seeding of the APB MWT Opening              20

Event (Pipeline)

1.14                  Seeding of APB Standalone MWT                20

Events (standard 48 person draw)

1.15                  Seeding of APB MWT/APB Regional           20

Tour Dual Rated Events

1.16                  Seeding of APB MWT Extreme Wave           21

Events

1.17                  Seeding of APB WWT, DKWT and PJWT Events      21

1.18             APB Points Allocation                                                 21

1.19                              Round and Heat Format & Progression                 22

1.20                              Event Entry Procedure                                               23

1.21                              Non-attendance at Events                                        24

1.22                              Missed Heats                                                               25

1.23                              Event Check-In                                                           26

1.24                  Attendance at Press/Media                         26

Conferences and Organised Event‑

related Functions

1.25                              Event Security and Authorised                                27

Access Areas

1.26                              Competition Areas                                                      29

1.27                              Double Banks/Breaks                                             31

 

2.0         COMPETITION RULES                               32

2.1                                  Draws, Pre-heat Check-In and                    32

Competition Vests

2.2                                  Heat Durations                                                           33

2.3                                  Heat Stage Indicators                                                33

2.4            Additional Paddle-out time and                  34

Delayed Heat Starts

2.5            Interrupted Heats                                                       35

2.6            Time Calls and Other                                   37

Announcements

2.7            Equipment Caddies                                                   38

2.8                                                                      Maximum Wave Quota per Heat                            39

2.9            Scoring Rides within Heat Time                               40

2.10                   Scoring Rides in the Competition Area   41

2.11                              Manual Tabulation of Scores                                   41

2.12                  Computerised Tabulation                                        46

2.13                  Official Protests                                                            46

2.14                  Determining heat placings and                               46

Progression

2.15                 Announcement of Results                             47

2.16                  Heat Fixing and Betting                                            47

2.17                              Water Photographers                                                48

2.18                              Water Patrol / Rescue Management                     48

 

3.0          PERSONAL WATER CRAFT (PWC)            50

3.1                                  General Conditions                                                     50

3.2                                  Rescue and Safety Issues                                         50

3.3            Transfer of Competitors                                             51

3.4            Transfer of Caddies                                                    52

3.5            Priority for PWC                                                           52

 

4.0          JUDGING                                                      53

4.1            Panel Composition and Selection for                     53

APB World Tour Events

4.2           Payments and Conditions for Judges          54

4.3                                  Head Judge                                                                  55

4.4            International Touring Judges                                   56

4.5            Regional Judges and Spotters                                 56

4.6            Judging Criteria                                                           57

4.7            Scoring Range                                                              58

4.8            Recording of Scores                                                    59

4.9                                  Recording of Interferences                                        61

4.10             Replay Systems                                                           62

4.10             Judging – Miscellaneous Conditions                      62

 

5.0          INTERFERENCE AND PRIORITY            64

RULES

5.1                                  Basic Rule                                                                     64

5.2                                  Right of Way in 4-Person and Non-                         65

priority 2-Person Heats

5.3            Snaking Interference                                                  67

5.4            Paddling Interference – Non-priority                       67

5.5            Priority Situations in one-on-one Heats                 69

5.6            Priority in 4 and 3 Person Heats                              71

 

 

 

 

6.0          MISCELLANEOUS                                       74

6.1                                  Death/Disablement                                                   74

6.2                                  Code of Conduct – APB Event Staff                        74

6.3                                  Code of Conduct – APB Competitors                     76

6.4                                  Disciplinary Committee                                             77

6.5            Conduct in a Manner Befitting a                             77

Professional Sportsperson

  1. 6 Misconduct and Disciplinary Action 78

APPENDICES

A            List of applicable fines and penalties    81

 

1.0        THE APB WORLD TOUR

1.1      APB World Tour Sanction Fees and

Licensing

 

  • The APB will grant a licence to “the promoter” for the

rights to hold an APB World Tour event or a specialty event only once event confirmation form is received and the applicable sanction fee has been paid in full to the APB at least 3 months prior to the event. For Grand Slam events an ELA or event license application will be issued by APB and the event will have to confirm prior to the calendar year commencing.

1.1.02            An APB World Tour event means an event on the Men’s

World Tour (MWT), Women’s World Tour (WWT), Drop Knee World Tour (DKWT) or Pro Junior World Tour (PJWT).

1.1.03           An APB specialty event sanction fee is US$2000. A

“specialty event” is any other type of event such as big wave, big air, special format or expression session.

1.1.04             One sanction fee is payable per APB World Tour event
regardless of only one or a combination of MWT, WWT, DKWT or PJWT competitions.

1.1.05           Sanction Fee’s start at US$2000 for a MWT Event and

US$1000 for a WWT, DKWT or PJWT event. These are required for the rights to hold an event on the APB World Tour. More detailed sanction fees breakdowns are laid out in the “2016 APB Event Sanctioning Requirements”.

1.1.06          A standalone specialty event or one held in conjunction

with a sanctioned world tour event but having a different promoter will attract a sanction fee of US$2000. If it has the same promoter as a sanctioned world tour event

the sanction fee will be reduced to US$1000.

1.1.07           Once the sanction fee is paid a Licence Agreement will be

issued to the event licensee detailing the licensee’s exclusive rights and responsibilities regarding the event.

1.1.08           The licensee will then be recognized as “the promoter”.

1.1.09            The Licence Agreement and sanctioning requirements will

detail for an event, the mandatory requirements for

allocation and payment of prizemoney, event administration, event staffing, payment to staff, event infrastructure and facilities, equipment, supplies and services to be provided at the event.

1.1.10          The conditions set out in individual Licence Agreements

will be determined by the APB Executive and will preside over any conditions set out in this rulebook where any conflict might exist.

1.1.11            Sanction fees are to be paid in full a minimum of 3

calendar months prior to commencement of an APB event.
1.1.12           Sanction fees once paid to the APB are non-refundable.

1.2      Prizemoney

 

1.2.01             The minimum total prizemoney required to stage an APB MWT event is US$10,000 for a 1-star rated event. APB Grand Slam events will have a minimum total prizemoney of US$50,000 for a 4-star rated event. The minimum total prizemoney required to stage an APB WWT event is US$5,000 for a 1-star rated event. The minimum total prizemoney required to stage an APB DKWT event is US$5,000 for a 1-star rated event. The minimum total prizemoney required to stage an APB PJWT event is US$3,500 for a 1-star rated event. More detailed prizemoney breakdowns are laid out in the “2016 APB Event Sanctioning Requirements”.

1.2.02             Total event prizemoney is to be paid to the APB by the

event promoter, in $US at least 2 days prior to completion of the event to the Technical Director or APB Tour manager.

1.2.03            The breakdown of prizemoney per event placing is

dependent on the total prizemoney for the event. Prizemoney allocations are set by the APB and are subject to change.

1.2.04              Prizemoney and staff remuneration (for non-resident, touring staff) are not to include any deduction for tax. The promoter is responsible to ensure that the APB is informed as soon as possible if tax deductions from prizemoney or touring staff’s payments are a legal requirement. The promoter must provide contestants or staff subject to tax deductions with proper advice and/or the appropriate forms to enable tax refunds to be claimed. Prizemoney should be allocated as per 1.2.05 below. It is the promoter’s responsibility to ensure extra funding to cover any shortfall caused by tax deductions applied to prizemoney or staff remuneration.

1.2.05             Prizemoney will normally be paid to bodyboarders by the

APB on behalf of the event promoter in $US either in cash or via direct transfer into a bodyboarder’s nominated bank account within 72 hours of event completion.

1.2.06         If requested by bodyboarders, alternative means of
payment such as in local currency, traveler’s cheques or bank cheques may be approved by the APB.

1.2.07                                With the exception of finalists, prizemoney will be paid to

bodyboarder’s immediately on elimination from a “money round” (the round in which a rider’s overall placing clearly entitles them to prizemoney) in an event.

1.2.08                    Prizemoney for finalists will be paid as soon as the winner

of the event has been announced at the presentation.

1.2.09          In the event that Prizemoney exceeds the minimum
purse, refer to the APB points and prizemoney breakdown.

1.2.10          If an Event is unable to be completed for any reason, the
prizemoney for the remaining positions (irrespective of whether or not the event has reached a money round) will be divided equally among the remaining competitors, being those not yet eliminated from the competition.

1.2.11               Prizemoney not claimed within 14 days will incur a
deduction of 10% that will go back to the APB. Remaining prizemoney will be held for 6 months and if still unclaimed at that time will be forfeited and returned in full to the APB.

1.2.12             In the event that the prizemoney round is not completely

full, unclaimed prizemoney is withheld by the APB to compensate additional / unforeseen expenses. For WWT events unclaimed prizemoney will be either be distributed to the top 4 placegetters or held by APB to help Women’s development / promotion.

1.2.13             If two or more riders fail to catch waves in a money round

due to extreme conditions or fail to clearly progress, then points and prizemoney for their combined placings (ie:3rd + 4th)will be added and equally distributed to each rider.

 

1.3 – Scheduling of Events

1.3.01 The APB executive will control the scheduling of

events for the APB World Tour.

1.3.02                     Decisions regarding amendments to the APB World Tour

including the sanctioning of any new events or cancellation of existing events must be ratified by the APB executive. This will be done at least 3 months in advance of planned event commencement date. In the case of new events and as soon as possible in the case of an event cancellation.

1.3.03                     The APB World Tour will be run in a standard calendar

year (from 1st January to 31st December in any particular year).

1.3.04               A break of one month will ideally be scheduled between                                                        the end of the APB World Tour in any year and recommencement the following year.

1.3.05            The number and timing of APB World Tour events will

ensure a balance between the amount of events required to produce a competitive result and the needs of professional bodyboarders to rest adequately between events and to maintain peak form. Breaks between events will be scheduled also to consider planning and travel time for international competitors and officials between events where possible.

1.3.06            The annual calendar of APB Grand Slam events will

ideally have at least one event in each APB Region, however, preference will be given to having an event in particular Regions if the promoter wishing to hold an event in that Region clearly demonstrates the ability to satisfy the main criteria for a desirable APB World Tour event. This includes fully meeting all licensing conditions, planning to stage the event at a premier wave location and/or offering a comparatively high total prize purse in comparison with events bid for other regions. Similarly, a bid from within an APB Region to hold an event may be declined on the basis that the promoter is unable to meet the criteria outlined above.

1.3.07         The 9 APB Regions include APB South America, APB North America, APB Europe, APB Africa, APB Australia, APB Asia, APB Central America, APB Indian Ocean, APB Pacific Ocean.

1.4     APB World Tour Event Status

1.4.01            The APB Board will determine the status of events for the

APB World Tour, based on event location, event prizemoney and ability of the event owner to meet the “2016 Event Sanctioning Requirements”.

1.4.02             APB World Tour events are “star” rated according to status, prizemoney and APB points allocation, whereby:

  • MWT Events, start at 1-star with a required minimum prizemoney of $US10,000 with the winner accumulating 1,000 points and go up to 6-star with a required minimum prizemoney of $100,000 with the winner accumulating 12,000 points.
  • At least 60% of “Grand Slam” events must be held in premier wave locations to enable high performance bodyboarding in quality conditions.
  • WWT Events, start at 1 star with a required minimum prizemoney of $US5000 with the winner accumulating 1000 points and go up to 6 star with a required minimum prizemoney of $50000 with the winner accumulating 12000 points.
  • DKWT Events, start at 1 star with a required minimum prizemoney of $US5000 with the winner accumulating 1000 points and go up to 6 star with a required minimum prizemoney of $40000 with the winner accumulating 12000 points.
  • PJWT Events, start at 1 star with a required minimum prizemoney of $US3500 with the winner accumulating 1000 points and go up to 6 star with a required minimum prizemoney of $30000 with the winner accumulating 12000 points.

 

1.5      APB Membership and Fees

1.5.01.                      All APB Tour competitors are required to pay membership fees.

1.5.02               The APB Top 28 riders, as rated 1 – 28 at the end of the

previous year (the “Top 28”) will be required to pay the APB a fee of US$500 at the start of each year at least one calendar month prior to commencement of the opening event in order to preserve “automatic Top 28” seeding privileges for the whole of the new year’s tour.

1.5.03             For all competitors, an APB fee (mandatory entry fee) pe                    event of US$50 will apply.

1.5.04             An APB fee (mandatory entry fee) per event is also
required for WWT, DKWT and PJWT competitors. The fee is US$30 per WWT event, US$20 per DKWT event and US$10 per PJWT event competitor.

1.5.05              The Top 8 WWT riders, as rated 1 – 8 at the end of the

previous year (the “Top 8”) will be required to pay the APB fee of $200 at the start of each year at least one calendar month prior to commencement of the opening event in order to preserve “automatic Top 8” seeding privileges for the whole of the new year’s tour.

1.5.06             Once a Top Rider is confirmed it confers membership to that rider only for the remainder of the year, not beyond it and irrespective of how many events remain to complete the current tour.

1.5.07         APB individual event entry fees, once paid are generally
non-refundable where a rider does not compete either in one or more events on the World Tour in that calendar

year. The only exception will be where failure to compete is due to injury, illness or other major personal crisis verified by the APB (e.g. on provision of a medical certificate or other suitable evidence) prior to an event or tour as may apply. Only on provision of suitable evidence prior to an event or prior to tour commencement, will consideration be given to refund such fees in full or in part as applicable.

1.5.08                     Where a rider pays fees as set out above in Section 1.5,

they will be sent a receipt and APB e-newsletter

containing membership information, tour schedule, APB membership details and a copy of (and/or electronic link to) the BIO Limited/APB World Tour Rulebook.

1.5.09             New and existing APB World Tour participants are

encouraged to attend any pre-event briefings prior to competing for the first time or in any event on the APB World Tour.

1.5.10           All riders must sign and complete a standard APB

Rider’s Contract (to join the APB) prior to competing for the first time on the APB World Tour each year (see also 1.20.07).

1.5.11                             Wildcard entries must pay all event entry fees and APB fees.

1.5.12            All applicable entry fees are listed in the “2016 Event                 Sanctioning Requirements”. Failure to pay the entry fee on time will incur a late payment fee of US$25.

1.5.13             A full year, “Medical Wild Card” (MWC) Exemption can be applied for by any athlete who is a current MWT Top 28 competitor or WWT Top 8 competitor. All cases will be assessed individually by the APB and will need to be supported by acceptable medical evidence. Medical evidence (a certificate or letter from a General Practitioner or appropriate Medical Specialist) must support that more than half of the scheduled number of events on the APB World Tour will be missed by a competitor due to a temporary medical condition, illness or injury preventing them from competing (where the condition is not expected to persist for more than 12 months). Where proven, the competitor will be granted a MWC exemption from the APB World Tour from the time of onset of the medical condition until the end of the current tour, or until the end of the following year’s tour (as deemed appropriate), without loss of Top Rider status. A temporary medical condition includes pregnancy in the case of a WWT competitor. If the APB accepts a MWC for a full tour year (or part thereof), then that athlete will be included in the Top riders for the following year’s tour and subsequently the Top riders will increase by 1 (or more) persons. When this happens the MWC will be afforded all the fees and benefits of the MWT Top 28 or WWT Top 8. The seeding requirements will then vary by including this athlete into the event draws taking one of the APB wild card seeding positions when necessary. Thereby any reference in this rule book to the Top 28 (or Top 8) will also include, by definition, any additional MWC’s as a part of the Top 28 (or Top 8).

 

1.6     Trials and Specialty Events

1.6.01             Specialty events such as flowrider or wave pool events,

tow-in events, events held under lights, “big air”, “big wave”, other altered-format events or “expression sessions” may be run before, within or in conjunction with APB World Tour events. Advance approval of the APB regarding the rules, prizemoney, seeding, format and amount of time needed to hold such events must be attained and conditions detailed in a licensing agreement between the APB and the specialty event promoter.

1.6.02         Where trials are to be run for any APB World Tour event, the event promoter must ensure that scheduling of trials allows for their completion prior to the commencement of the competition window of the main event.

1.6.03           Trials for any APB World Tour main event may be held at

an alternative wave location to that of the main event, as deemed suitable by the Tour Manager.

1.6.04           For practical and logistical reasons, trials where not held

at the main event break should be held where possible at a location close to the main event break and should be held so they are completed at least the day immediately preceding commencement of the main event check-in.

1.6.05         If scheduled as part of APB World Tour event, specialty
events may be cancelled or postponed by the APB without prior notice if this is deemed necessary in order to facilitate timely completion of the main event in the most suitable wave conditions. The final decision will rest with the Event Director in conjunction with the APB Tour Manager.

1.6.06            The event promoter will only be refunded for the sanction

fee as the result of a specialty event not running pursuant to 1.6.05 above and will be wholly liable to bear any other financial burden or sponsorship forgone as a result.

1.7 – Event Window Periods

1.7.01                For MWT events, an event window of at least 4 days will                                                                                                                                                                                                    normally be required to allow completion of the event in suitable contestable wave conditions.

1.7.02                For WWT and DKWT events, an event window of at least 3 days will normally be required to allow completion of the event in suitable contestable wave conditions. If both divisions are in the same contest, if is a good location and light to run the contest. If is a beach break with variable-poor conditions than 6 days is required.

1.7.03             For a MWT 6 Star event a maximum of 10 days will be set to allow completion of the event at a premier wave location in the most ideal wave conditions promoting high performance bodyboarding.

1.8 – Contest Days and Lay Days

1.8.01              The event committee will decide which days of the waiting period are selected as contest days. The event committee will consist of the following: APB Technical Director/Tour Manager, APB Head Judge, Local Rider Respected Athlete and an APB Riders representative. A general consensus between these three people (whereby at least three of the four are in agreement) will determine whether or not any part of the event will be contested on any particular day of the event window.

1.8.02            The decision to hold the event, postpone the event to later

in the day or to call a lay day will be announced by the Technical Director as early as possible on each day of the contest window prior to event completion.

1.8.03                  Once a decision has been announced on the day to

contest the event, have a part-day postponement or a “lay day” the decision may not be reversed in fairness to riders who may leave the event site immediately following the announcement.

1.8.04            The decision to hold the contest on any particular day

will be made with consideration of planned completion of entire rounds of the draw. Only in limited event windows where extremely poor conditions are prevailing and expected to deteriorate (to the extent that timely completion of the event becomes a major issue), will rounds be split up over two days. This will ensure that for most APB events, entire rounds are completed in reasonably consistent surf conditions for all competitors and that none gain an advantage by not having to surf in

undesirable although contestable conditions.

1.9      Mobile Events and Alternate Locations

1.9.01               Promoters may with approval of the APB obtain local

permits to hold an APB World Tour event at an alternative wave location to that initially planned in order to maximize the likelihood of running the event in ideal conditions.

1.9.02            At any alternate wave locations the Promoter must

ensure that event infrastructure provides minimum requirements for competitors, officials and entourage (see Appendix A) and that they are still able to meet all the event licensing conditions.

1.9.03            Alternate wave locations must be within a reasonable

distance from the original planned wave location and transport to and from the new location where possible

will be made available by the Promoter to any international competitors who may require it as a

consequence of the event having been moved.

 

1.10   Insurance and Permits

1.10.01         Event insurance is the responsibility of the Promoter.

These permits must be made available to the APB three months in advance of the first day of competition.

1.10.02       Public Liability Insurance, various types of permits and

various licenses will be required and these solely remain the responsibility of the Promoter as per APB licensing agreement and with respect to laws operating in the country, region and locality where the event is to be held.

1.10.03           The APB advises that all competitors and officials should
arrange personal insurance through a broker to cover themselves for possible injury, illness or death whilst competing at, working at and travelling to/from APB events. Travel insurance generally does not cover professional athletes in competition.

1.10.04           Competitors and officials should be aware that in most

countries, standard travel insurance agreements often contain clauses to void any claim due to accident sustained while competing as a professional sportsperson where prizemoney is involved. For this reason a broker is highly recommended.

1.11     Event Formats (APB World Tour)

1.11.01         There are 3 event formats on the APB World Tour:

  • APB MWT 48 man format.
  • APB WWT and DKWT event format.
  • APB PJWT event format.

 

1.11.02           The APB may be vary published event formats at any time after consultation with the event committee pending the need to conclude an event within the contest window. For further information in relation to event formats and event draws (please contact craig@apbtour.com for details).

1.12    Event Seeding – General Seeding Order

and Replacement Rules

1.12.01           Seeding

  • The overriding rule for determining when the cut off point for using base points for seeding in a current year is, the 50% plus 1 formula. So that if the number of events at the start of the tour is known then this formula can be invoked right from the start. Otherwise:
  1. For the 1st event the ranking of the previous year’s tour determines the seedings.
  2. For the 2nd event the seeding is made with the ranking of the previous year + the 1st event of the

current year.

  1. For the 3rd event the seeding is made with the ranking of the previous year + the 1st and 2nd events of the current year.
  2. For the 4th event the seeding is made with the ranking of the previous year + the 1st, 2ndand 3rd events of the current year.
  3. For the 5th event the seeding is made with the ranking of the previous year + the 1st, 2nd 3rd and 4th events of the current year.
  4. After that the seeding is made with the ranking of the current year.

1.12.02          The top seed for an event always has the lowest number

(i.e., the No. 1 seed is the top seed).

1.12.03           The bottom seed for an event always has the highest

number (i.e., in a field of 128 riders, the No. 128th seed is the bottom seed).

1.12.04                      Where current or previous APB MWT, WWT, DKWT or

various APB Regional Tour rankings are used to seed competitors, the highest seed goes to the rider with the highest amount of Points as per current rankings, the lowest seed goes to the rider with the least points

1.12.05           At all MWT events, depending on the injury wild card status for the year, the previous years Top 28 will be
seeded into the main event and joined by four wildcards and sixteen riders from the trials. If a seeded Top 28 rider fails to confirm his attendance prior to the event,

then these spots will be allocated to the next highest ranked competitor from the current rankings.

1.12.06         At all MWT events the previous year’s Top 28 MWT riders

pursuant to 1.5.02 automatically retain their top 28 seed into the main event. These riders will be reseeded within this group based on how they perform throughout the competition year. This arrangement starts from the first event and holds through to the last event of the current tour year, despite the fact that automatic Top 28 seeds may not enter every event and despite the fact that their current tour ranking based on APB points at any stage of the MWT may see them placed outside of the “current Top 28” going into an event.

1.12.07     If a Wildcard rider relinquishes their spot at any APB

event, this will be allocated to another Wildcard rider or to a MWC at the discretion of the APB.

1.12.08       The APB Wildcard committee will decide no less than one

month prior to the event the wildcard positions. The

nominations must be received prior to the start of the voting process and these nominees must be available to attend the event. Nominations must come from the riders themselves and a list will be compiled for each event for the committee to vote on. A suitable time frame to organize travel and accommodation must be provided.

1.12.09        At each APB MWT event 4 Wildcard positions are

allocated. 2 positions are allocated by the APB and 2 spots are for an event director. The event director may choose to defer wildcard selection, in which case the APB will use the remaining positions. The selected wildcards must be APB members and comply with all normal rules. They may receive points and prizemoney and must pay all contest fees.

Wildcards may gain selection for an event on the basis that they are:

  • the defending champion of that event or a past champion of the event;
  • a currently unrated past APB International Champion,
  • a currently unrated APB Regional Tour Champion from the region holding the event;
  • currently unrated riders of high renown from the break or region in which the event is held; or
  • a rider who gains an exemption from bodyboarding in the preliminary rounds due to their affiliation with the major sponsor/s of the event (i.e., major

sponsor’s team riders), as selected by the Event Director.

1.12.10        The defending champion (not past) of an event if not

seeded into the main event must receive a Wild-Card invitation, whether the event was APB sanctioned the previous year or not.

1.12.11             Wildcard riders are normally seeded 29 to 32 in any MWT

event. APB wildcards will normally be seeded 29 to 30.

1.12.12        For WWT events, seeding order will be as follows:

  • For the opening tour event, the previous year’s top 8 or their replacements are seeded 1 – 8, being automatic seeds into the round prior to the quarter Wildcards if requested are seeded 15 and 16, and the remaining competitors are seeded as per their previous year’s end ranking (first considering any riders with a ranking from the previous APB World Tour, then those with ranking from the previous years APB Regional Tour).
  • For remaining tour events, the previous year’s top 8 or their replacements are seeded 1 – 8 with reseeding within the top 8 after each event. Wildcards if requested at 15 and 16, and the remaining competitors are seeded as per current APB seeding points which are a combination of their seeding points from their end of year previous year’s ranking and their current tour points.
  • For WWT events 2 wild cards will be issued. APB will retain one of these positions and 1 will be for the event director to select.

1.12.13                    For DKWT events, seeding order will be as follows:

  • For the opening tour event, the previous year’s top 8 or their replacements are seeded 1 – 8, being automatic seeds into the round prior to the quarter Wildcards if requested are seeded 15 and 16, and the remaining competitors are seeded as per their previous year’s end ranking (first considering any riders with a ranking from the previous APB World Tour, then those with ranking from the previous year’s APB Regional Tour).
  • For remaining tour events, the previous year’s top 8 or their replacements are seeded 1 – 8 with reseeding within the top 8 after each event. Wildcards if requested at 15 and 16, and the remaining competitors are seeded as per current APB seeding points which are a combination of their seeding points from their end of year previous year’s ranking and their current tour points.
  • For DKWT events 2 wild cards will be issued. APB will retain one of these positions and 1 will be for the event director to select.
  • In all events the seeding order, after selecting the seeds for each round from the previous years rankings, will be based on a combination of the prior year’s base points and current year’s adjusted rankings Prior year’s base points are determined by the amount of events in that calendar year. A 50% plus 1 formula will be used to determine the cut off point for when these points will be dropped.
  • Remaining riders with no points will be seeded as per the date that the entry is received.
  • To help eliminate no shows, only riders who have attended the pre-event check-in or contacted the APB to confirm their attendance will be included in the
  • The event draw should be able to be finalized immediately after the pre-event check-in and made available to competitors that night or on the following

1.13     Seeding of the APB MWT Opening Event

(Pipeline 84 person draw)

1.13.01             Automatic APB Top 32 are seeded 1 to 32.

1.13.02           The next highest seeds will be the 4 APB special wild cards (past event winners) These riders are seeded 33 to 36.

1.13.03       The next highest seeds are the 24 invited riders.

1.13.04       The next highest seeds are the 16 Hawaii Tour riders.

1.13.05           The final 8 position for the main event will come from the event trials.

1.13.06         Any other competitor may enter through the event trials.

 

1.14   Seeding of APB Standalone MWT

Events (Standard 48 person format)

1.14.01          All competitors start in the first round. 16 x 3 man heats.

1.14.02        Seeding into this round will be the APB Top 28.

1.14.03        Also seeded into this round will be the 4 wild cards.

1.14.04          Next to be seeded are the 16 trials positions.

1.14.05          Anyone can enter these events and will need to surf through the trials. In the event that trials are not required then seeding into this round will come for the current world tour rankings.

1.15    Seeding of APB MWT/APB Regional Tour                    Dual Rated Events

1.15.01      In dual rated events first to be seeded are Top 28.

1.15.02    Next are the 4 event wildcards.

1.15.03        Next to be seeded on an equal basis is the current MWT

rated riders and APB Regional Tour rated riders not            already seeded higher. This type of seeding is known as “1 for 1 APB/Regional”.

1.15.04        Next to be seeded are any qualifying trialists.

1.15.05      Last to be seeded are pre-trialists and any amateur riders

given entry into trials or preliminary rounds determined on the date the entry was received.

 

1.16     Seeding of APB MWT Extreme Wave Events

1.16.01            All competitors start in the first round. 16 x 3 man heats.

1.16.02         Seeding into this round will be the APB Top 28.

1.16.03          Also seeded into this round will be the 4 wild cards.

1.16.04          Next to be seeded are 8 APB special invitees.

1.16.04          Next to be seeded are 8 trials positions.

1.16.05          Anyone can enter these events and will need to surf through the trials. In the event that trials are not required then seeding into this round will come for the current world tour rankings.

1.17     Seeding of all APB WWT,DKWT and PJWT Events

1.17.01           First to be seeded are Automatic Top 8 seeds.

1.17.02        Next to be seeded are next 6 highest rated.

1.17.03        Next to be seeded are the 2 event Wildcards if requested.

1.17.04        Next to be seeded are any current WWT rated riders not

already seeded higher.

1.17.05        Next to be seeded are any riders with current APB

Regional Tour Points rankings not already seeded higher.

1.17.06        Next to be seeded are any qualifying trialists.

1.17.07       Last to be seeded are pre-trialists and any amateur riders

given entry into trials or preliminary rounds.

1.18    APB Points Allocation

1.18.01           APB Points will be allocated for each event placing dependent on the numbers of competitors, the event format, star-rating and prizemoney on offer.

1.18.02         Points allocations for each event placing will be made

known to competitors well in advance of the event and will be posted on the APB tour website.

1.18.03           The rider with the highest amount of APB points at the
end of the Tour year will be deemed the APB Tour Champion. This will be calculated using a 50% + 1 formula. This same formula will be used for WWT, DKWT and PJWT tours. Rounding “UP” will always be used in any calculations including “Best results”.

1.18.04         Ties will be broken on completion of the tour in the same

manner as ties are broken in heat tabulation. If a tie is unable to be broken in this manner only then will the past year’s tour standing be used to break a tie.

1.18.05           Base points from the previous year will start at 1000 for
the winner.

1.18.06      In order to gain points from a heat a competitor needs to physically touch the water.

1.19    Round and Heat Format and Progression

1.19.01           Standard MWT events will normally contain a field of 48      competitors.

1.19.02           In round 1 there will be 48 competitors in 16 heats of 3                                                    competitors per heat.

1.19.03               After round 1 all following heats will be one on one format.

1.19.04              All heats will have a minimum of 50% progression rate.

1.19.05      In 4-person heats, the standard round progression rule will be such that 1st and 2nd place in a heat will progress to the next round and 3rd and 4th place will be eliminated.

1.19.06           The only exception to 1.19.05 will be where the contest is
formatted to include progression of lower heat placings (i.e., 3rd and/or 4th place) into a repercharge round. Such a format will only be included at the discretion of the APB Event Director. The inclusion of repercharge rounds will not be common practice and will only apply to rounds wholly containing amateur or unrated riders, should the event window allow them to be completed within timeliness.

1.19.07                    Whilst not compulsory, the APB strongly encourages

promoters to use one-on-one format. If not for the entire event, one-on-one format should be implemented where the event window allows timely completion from the final round of 16 riders onwards. The 1st place rider progresses to the next round and the 2ndplaced rider is eliminated from the competition. Special interference and priority rules apply in one-on-one formats.

1.19.08            3 and 2 person heats may result in some heats in Round1, due to an uneven number of riders preventing a full round (e.g., a round of 25 riders may be drawn up as 7 heats x 3 riders each plus one x 4-person heat, a round of 19 riders may be drawn up as 3 heats x 3 riders each plus 5 x 2-person heats etc).

1.19.09          3 and 2 person heats may also result in some rounds due

to competitors failing to show for their heat or due to retirement by injury. Another rider will not replace these riders and if there are 2 or more riders remaining, they must still contest the heat in order to be seeded correctly for progression to the next round. The heat time for these heats may be reduced.

1.19.10         Round 1 may be structured to include 4 heats instead of

8 due to the number of competitors involved.

1.19.12           No competitor can start an event to fill a draw vacancy from           any other Round except round 1.

1.20    Event Entry Procedure

1.20.01       All riders intending to compete in an APB event must pay

the APB fee to the APB pursuant to conditions in Section 1.5 of these rules. This is always contained in the entry fee.

1.20.02      In addition to paying the associated fees as stated each

competitor (including APB Top 28) must also complete, sign and return to the promoter an event entry form, confirming their intention to compete. This will allow correct seeding and preparation of the event draw within appropriate timelines standards.

1.20.03           Failure to confirm intention to compete pursuant to 1.20.02 will result in loss of any seeding that competitor may have had going into the event.

1.20.04         Once the Promoter has received an entry form, the rider

will be deemed to be an entrant/potential contender and will be seeded into the event.

1.20.05          No beach entries will be accepted for any main events or

rounds where riders competing are seeded pursuant to 1.12.03. Beach entries may only be accepted for amateur riders for pre-trial rounds outside the main event and if requested by the Event Promoter with the approval of the APB Technical Director. Normal conditions in respect of payment of the administration fee per event will apply as per 1.5.04.

1.20.06        Once a rider has actually competed in any event and

been awarded APB points pursuant to Section 1.18, they are invited to enter any APB event on the current tour and will be seeded accordingly.

1.20.07               ALL Riders competing in an APB rated event (Men or

Women) will have to sign an APB rider’s contract, before being able to compete. This form will be either attached to the entry form or will be available separately at the event check-in (see also 1.5.10).

1.21    Non-attendance at Events

1.21.01           Any rider who has not returned an entry form for an

event within timeliness will be assumed to be non-contenders for the event.

1.21.02          Top 28 riders will need to confirm their attendance

at least 1 month prior to event.

1.21.03         Once a competitor is deemed to have entered an event, it

will be assumed that they will compete at the event. Entrants are expected to confirm their attendance at an event check-in, details of which will be provided to all entrants prior to event commencement.

1.21.04         Non-attendance for medical or personal reasons must be

supported in order to avoid possible fines or non-refund of fees paid to APB, whether in full or in part. In order to support medical or personal reasons for non-attendance by an entrant, they (or their representative) must provide the APB Technical Director (if totally absent from the whole of the event) or Tour Manager (if still present at the event but misses a heat) a signed and dated medical certificate completed by a qualified medical practitioner or other supporting evidence for assessment. “Supporting evidence” which may be deemed satisfactory includes but is not limited to: evidence of personal tragedy, death or acute serious illness in the immediate family or involving a spouse/partner, or other misfortune beyond the control of the individual – including documentary evidence of cancellation of travelling arrangements by airlines.

1.21.05             The decision as to whether any evidence provided is
deemed satisfactory to excuse non-attendance lies ultimately with the Tour Manager who will consult with a qualified health professional and/or the APB Tour Manager as required before any decision is made.

1.21.06        Where satisfactory evidence is provided prior to 48 hours before the competitor’s scheduled first heat, reseeding of the event may be undertaken at the discretion of the APB Technical Director.

1.21.07                  Where satisfactory evidence is provided from between 48

hours before and 48 hours after the competitor’s

scheduled heat, and the rider has not competed in any heat in the event), they will not be replaced, will not earn any APB points as a result of seeding, but will not incur any fine and will be refunded the entry fee.

1.21.08                 Where satisfactory evidence is provided between 48 hours

before and 48 hours after commencement of the competitor’s next scheduled heat, and they have already progressed through at least one round in the main event, they will not be replaced, will be deemed to be eliminated as the lowest placed competitor in the their next heat but they will be entitled to any APB points and prizemoney that would have applied had they surfed and placed last in the missed heat. They will not incur any fine, however will not be refunded any part of the event entry fee.

1.21.09           Once a rider has confirmed entry, their non-attendance
at events for any reason where evidence pursuant to 1.21.03 – 1.21.04 has not been provided or has been provided after the total field placings have been allocated will incur forfeiture of any entry fees paid to the APB, loss of APB points for that event and loss of any prizemoney

that would otherwise have been paid for that event. Their prizemoney may be re-allocated to other contestants as deemed fit by the APB Technical Director.

1.21.10      In addition to 1.21.08, a competitor may be fined for non‑attendance without acceptable excuse (see Appendix A).

1.22   Missed Heats

1.22.01                Once a rider has checked-in they are expected to compete

in their allocated round/heat.

1.22.02     If a rider is unable to compete in their scheduled

heat/round due to satisfactory medical or personal

reasons as per 1.21.03 then 1.21.06 will apply.

1.22.03                      Where a rider refuses to contest a heat due to a fear for

their personal safety but conditions have been deemed suitable by the APB Technical Director and Head Judge, a formal statement written, signed and dated by that rider must be given to the APB Technical Director prior to the rider’s scheduled heat/round in order that they retain points and prizemoney from that round.

1.22.04      If a rider misses their heat for any other reason, then

1.21.06 may apply.

1.22.05        Fines for missed heats vary according to their status in

the event (see Appendix A).

1.22.06     In main events a Top 28 rider, wildcard or trialists

can be substituted by an alternate only if the seeded rider is injured and only in the first round.

1.23    Event Check-In

1.23.01         All competitors are required to register their attendance

with the Tour Manager and/or Technical Director on the day before the event commences.

1.23.02          Any competitors with beach entries (if accepted) will be

seeded lowest in the first round as designated by the Technical Director immediately prior to commencement of the event.

1.23.03          Top 28 seeds for the event must confirm their

attendance prior to check-in by submitting their entry forms for the event to the APB and the promoter 30 days prior to the event commencement. These riders should acknowledge their attendance with the Beach Marshall prior to commencement of their round.

1.24     Attendance at Press/Media Conferences

and Organised Event-related Functions

1.24.01         The Event Director will provide a schedule specifying the

locations and times of any organised press conferences or event-related functions to all competitors, prior to the event commencement.

1.24.02         Attendance at APB event press conferences and opening

ceremonies/functions is compulsory for the Top 28 seeds and Top 8 WWT event seeds, unless the APB Tour Manager grants prior approval. Non-attendance could result in a fine being issued at the discretion of the APB Tour Manager.

1.24.03         Finalists are to be available immediately after their final

for any beachside presentation and related media coverage (photos, live or recorded TV or other media coverage/broadcast) and must be wearing their coloured

contest singlet. Finalists may at the beachside presentation ceremony carry boards, fins and equipment bearing their sponsor’s logos. Failure to attend the presentation could result in a fine unless there is a satisfactory excuse.

1.24.04         Finalists and in particular an event winner must be

available to take part in media interviews for up to 30 minutes following announcement of the final placings as directed by the Media Director at this time.

1.24.05           No other event related function is compulsory; however it
is encouraged for all competitors to attend the official presentation function and any other functions organized for competitors by the APB or the event promoter.

1.24.06           Top 28 MWT and Top 8 WWT Seeds are encouraged to make
themselves available for media appearances during the competition as directed by the APB Media Director with approval of the APB Technical Director and/or Tour Manager. Such appearances will not be scheduled to conflict with competitor’s heat preparation or meal times.

1.24.07           All competitors must complete and submit an up-to-date
biography sheet that the APB can make available to the Head Announcer in commentary to identify riders in the competition for the benefit of spectators and fans at the event.

1.24.08         Profiles for Top 28 Men and Top 8 Women are available at

http://apbtour.com.

1.25    Event Security and Authorised Access

Areas

1.25.01          All events must have separate areas designated for event

staff, competitors and others associated with the event. These areas are to be smoke free and alcohol may only be permitted in a VIP area as designated for the event.

1.25.02           Cordoned official’s areas will be designated authorised for
access primarily by staff that are required to administer the event. Access to these areas will be as authorised by the Tour Manager or their delegate and will be regulated by Event Security. Person’s wishing to enter these areas may be requested to display and required to produce identification (e.g., band, badge, card, or pass) to gain security clearance before entry as required.

1.25.03           A competitor who knowingly enters/accesses any of the
official’s areas (especially the judge’s area) without authorisation may incur a fine (see Appendix A). They may also incur a fine if any guest of theirs does same.

1.25.04      Identification passes for people associated with the event
(if required to be used) may be used to identify a person

either as being either an Official (including their title e.g.,

Head Judge), Competitor, VIP, Media or Guest.

1.25.05         Official’s areas may include:

  • The Main Official’s Area used by the Tour Manager, Technical Director and their delegates;
  • The beach marshalling area;
  • The Announcer’s area;
  • The Computer Operator’s area;
  • The Media area;
  • The Judge’s area;
  • Any VIP area; and
  • The event kitchen.

1.25.06            The competitor’s area should be separate from the

official’s area and any public use area. It should be large enough and provide appropriate amenities to allow competitors adequate room to rest, eat/drink, prepare for heats etc. It must include a partitioned/private area for them to use to change/prepare for their heats plus a secure storage area for their personal equipment and belongings as well as a separate / portable toilet.

1.25.07           The competitor’s area should be an environment away
from direct noise and must offer competitors a direct view of the competition area.

1.25.08           No managers, competitor’s partner/spouse, family,

friends, coach or other guest will be allowed in the competitor’s preparation and storage areas unless approved by the Tour Manager. Fresh water and fruit need to be supplied for all competitors on a daily basis.

1.25.09      It is recommended that a defined guest’s area be made
available for use as an area where competitors may spend time with their partner/spouse, family, friends, manager, coach or other guest. This may be separate or combined with the competitor’s area as long as the basic conditions from 1.25.06 – 1.25.08 are met and the arrangement is approved by the Tour Manager.

1.25.10         Competitors are responsible to identify persons

associated with them in some way and should follow the correct security procedures established for individual events as advised by the Tour Manager. Guests will usually require passes in order that they may access any guest’s area.

1.25.11          Toilets on site will be provided by the event in portable

format (for use only by officials, VIPs, competitors, guests and spectators) where public toilets are not provided at or within close walking distance from the event site.
1.26    Competition Areas

1.26.01         The competition area where bodyboarders contest their

heats will be clearly defined from 2 points. These might be landmarks (in the case of a point break/rocks/cliff) flags or other markers (placed on the beach) or a combination of the two and must be clearly visible/identifiable by competitors and officials. The area will extend offshore from beach markers or landmarks directly perpendicular to the natural alignment of the beach face (i.e., directly offshore) from the water’s edge to 50 metres beyond the furthest initially breaking set waves. The area within this range between the 2 points is the competition area. The only exception will be where a competition area is a wave location characterised by a single unidirectional break with a defined outer take-off point (e.g.,Pipe and backdoor) in which case the competition area will be the entire break and all water surrounding it by 50 metres on all sides of the set wave’s extremities on any competition day.

1.26.02         The competition area will be selected and sized in such a

manner as to encompass a particular break or range of breaks allowing contestable, quality waves to be ridden for a reasonable distance from start to finish within the competition area.

1.26.03         The competition area should include water area markers.

1.26.04                    During competition, only competitors in a heat in progress are to access the competition area.

1.26.05                  Water patrol as authorised by the Technical Director will

make all reasonable attempts to keep the competition area clear from unauthorised access, advising free-surfers of the competition area boundaries and may also be involved in rescues of competitors contesting heats as required.

1.26.06         Competitors entered in the event (whether or not

eliminated from competition), whilst not competing in a heat in progress, if identified bodyboarding/free-surfing in the competition area by water patrol, Technical Director, Head Judge or Beach Marshall shall incur a fine

(see Appendix A). Repeated breaches of this nature will result in elimination from the event and loss of APB points

and potential prizemoney from the event (if still competing), or loss of APB points and an additional fine equalling any prizemoney already claimed from the event (if eliminated).

1.26.07       Any competitor free-surfing in the competition area

pursuant to 1.26.06 who is found to have hindered the scoring potential of a competitor in a heat in progress will be automatically disqualified from the event, lose all APB points, incur a fine, and will also be suspended from competing in the next 2 scheduled APB World Tour events.

1.26.08         Notwithstanding 1.26.05, Local Authorities will be called

upon (as per any agreement made with them), to eject any free-surfers in the competition area who are obviously impinging on competitors contesting their heats. In any case the APB will not be held liable in any way for any loss of potential scoring for any competitor hindered directly by any free-surfer not connected with the event.

1.26.09          Any competitor identified as having suffered loss of

scoring potential pursuant to 1.26.07 and 1.26.08 will be allowed an additional wave in their maximum allowable wave quota for that heat, for every instance where a single ride or score is affected.

1.26.10         The Technical Director may grant special access to the

competition area, on a case-by-case basis and under strict guidelines to water photographers, board caddies and practising competitors (immediately before and after and during any break in competition and for “expression sessions”).

1.27     Double Banks/Breaks

1.27.01         Approval of the APB Board must be sought

as a licensing condition if the event is to be run on split banks (2 simultaneously contested individual competition areas).

1.27.02                   Where possible there must be a 100m minimum buffer

between the two competition areas to avoid a potential situation where the 2 different breaks meet at a single point.

1.27.03      Individual competition areas in a split bank/break situation must be defined according to 1.26.01.

 

 

2.0        COMPETITION RULES

2.1      Draws, Pre-heat Check-In and

Competition Vests

2.1.01            A daily event draw will be made available to all

competitors and updated for current rounds and progressions throughout the day. It will be posted on a bulletin board or special draw-board near the beach marshalling area. It will display competitor’s round and heat numbers, heat times, what colour vest they are assigned and who the other riders in their heats are.

2.1.02             The Beach Marshall or Announcer should call
competitors once as a courtesy measure in the first 5 minutes of the heat immediately preceding their scheduled heat.

2.1.03              Competitors should ensure that they are at the beach

marshalling area with their bodyboarding equipment to check-in for their heat within at least 5 minutes of its scheduled commencement.

2.1.04            The Beach Marshall will assign and record delivery to

each competitor a coloured competition vest (Red, White, Yellow or Blue).

2.1.05             The competition vest is to be worn correctly from heat

check-in, throughout the heat and is to be returned within 10 minutes of heat completion. Whilst worn it is to be pulled all the way down and any promotional print relating to the event sponsor or event must be displayed outwards. A fine will result if this rule is contravened.

2.1.06             The Beach Marshall will remind competitors of their
maximum wave quota, heat length, paddle out time, responsibility to avoid competitors in a heat in progress during their paddle out, correct wearing and prompt return of competition vests and any other special instructions regarding the competition.

2.1.07                ALL beach marshals must be English speaking.

 

 

2.2     Heat durations

2.2.01            For all International MWT and WWT events 20 minutes is

the minimum heat time. For all men’s Top 28 heats, 25 minutes is the minimum heat time. With finals (which may include the semi finals but not usually the quarter

finals) extended to 25-30 minutes in duration.

2.2.02          For specialty events the rules in relation to heat times

may differ and the Technical Director prior to competitors entering the water will communicate the same.

2.3      Heat Stage Indicators

2.3.01           Heat start/finish and paddle-out times will be indicated

to competitors as follows:

Hooter/Siren Flag/Disc Lights
Start of Heat Single Blast Green
Heat in Progress Green
5 Minutes Remain –

Next Heat to Commence paddle-out

. Yellow Continuous
Flashing
Yellow
End of Heat Double Blast Red
30 Second gap between heats. Red
Extreme Danger

Exists – All riders to return to Shore immediately.

Continuous Blast Red

 

 

2.3.02              Competitors in the next heat may commence to paddle out only once the yellow signal (flag, disc and/or flashing light) is indicated, within the last 5 minutes of the heat that is immediately prior to their heat. They must not to paddle directly through the competition area, as they may hinder competitors actively competing, while they are paddling for or riding waves in their heat. Riders paddling out should instead paddle to one side of the competition area and if they reach the lineup prior to the end of the heat before theirs, should position themselves or sit away from the take-off zone and away from active heat competitors.

2.3.03             Once a heat finishes, prior to the next heat commencing there is normally a 30-second gap, to allow judges time to score any rides where competitors have taken-off in the last few seconds of the preceding heat. During this gap of time between heats, competitors in the next heat can move into position near the take-off zone but they must not gain initial momentum on any waves until their heat has commenced.

2.3.04             Once the start of a heat is indicated (with a single hooter blast, the green flag and/or disc), competitors in the current heat may commence to catch and ride waves in the competition area until their maximum wave quota is exhausted or until the heat ends, whichever is the sooner.

2.3.05             At the moment the end of a heat is first signaled (with commencement of a double hooter blast, and/or by indicating the red flag and/or disc), any competitor from that heat who does not have momentum on a wave under the wave’s own power, must return directly to shore, either by paddling in or by catching a wave straight to the beach in a prone position, without performing any maneuvers. Those who believe they already had momentum at heat finish can perform maneuvres and complete their scoring rides.

2.4      Additional Paddle-out time and Delayed

Heat Starts

2.4.01          There will normally be a 5 minute paddle-out time

allocated immediately prior to heat commencement to allow the riders enough time to reach the line -up. This may be extended if the main break of the competition area is a long paddle from the shore or when the competition wave is a beach break and the surf is very large. Extensions to paddle-out time will be at the discretion of the Technical Director and Head Judge. Alternatively paddle out times may be reduced where the surf is small and access to the break is easy.

2.4.02          Competitors may commence paddle-out only after being

signalled as per 2.3.01 and not before. Any infringement may incur a fine (See appendix A).

2.4.03            The Head Judge may delay the start of a heat to allow all

competitors in a heat, time to reach the line-up (usually when the majority have not done so in large surf conditions).

2.5      Interrupted Heats

2.5.01        In the event that judges are unable to clearly see the

competition area (most likely due to weather events such as fog, high glare or boat judged events) a heat may be interrupted by the Head Judge if competitors are deemed subject to disadvantage were the heat to continue.

2.5.02  In any situation where anything, including object, person/malicious event, craft, shark or other sea – creature , extreme weather condition, substance or spill/pollution causes injury to or endangers the life or

safety of any competitor in a heat, the Head Judge or Technical Director must stop the heat and give a signal for all riders to return to shore (see 2.3.01).

2.5.03             Pursuant to 2.5.02, this includes where any competitor

has returned to shore and informed APB officials about a situation, regardless of whether or not anyone else has become aware of its existence. The heat situation will be accessed by the Technical Director and Head Judge before any decisions will be made.

2.5.04                     Water Patrol if available will be contacted to assist in

removing any competitor/s to safety as per APB PWC guidelines.

2.5.05        Once the Head Judge and Tour Manager deem that the

situation has passed and that riders may now re-enter the competition area and contest their heat safely or with clear judge’s visibility, it may either be restarted from the time it was stopped (scores and wave quotas already established will count, however, all riders will be given the opportunity to re -enter the lineup prior to restart) or

completely re-contested from the start for its full duration if the Head Judge deems that no rider has any clear advantage over another (in which case any original scores will obviously not count).

2.5.06        If for one reason or another a heat is “broken” or interrupted by a mistake or an uncontrollable source

(i.e., the hooter is accidentally triggered early in a heat, incorrect announcements of time remaining are made, computer and/or power failures stop heat timing, the hooter misfires etc.,) then the mistake should immediately be brought to the attention of the Technical Director by the Head Judge, including the approximate stage/time at which the heat was interrupted. The Technical Director will then discuss the issue with the riders from the affected heat. The ultimate responsibility for determining further action lies with the riders and issues like this will not (in the majority of cases) result in the need to re-surf a heat.

2.5.07        If both riders in a one-one-one heat or the majority in a 3 or 4 person heat believe they have been affected by a broken heat and protest for a re-surf within 30 minutes of the completion of the broken heat, then the broken heat will be re-surfed. The heat will be re-scheduled at the discretion of the Head Judge and/or Technical Director.

2.5.08        If, due to deteriorating conditions, no rider catches a wave in the first 10 minutes of a heat, the Head Judge or Technical Director may restart the heat at that time or they may simply end the heat and determine it be re-surfed at a later time.

 

2.6      Time Calls and Other Announcements

2.6.01            During heats the Announcer may call to competitor’s a

count-down leading up to heat commencement. Time remaining in the heat may also be called occasionally (on a voluntary basis, as a courtesy measure) by the Announcer, however, competitors are ultimately responsible to monitor heat times themselves (e.g., by observing the signals indicating heat start and finishing times and by using their own portable timing devices).

2.6.02           The Announcer, as directed by the Head Judge may make calls to competitors regarding their wave counts (where they have one wave remaining or have reached their maximum wave quota) or their position in relation to the competition area boundary, but once again the onus lies with the competitors themselves to monitor their wave counts and their position and neither the Announcer nor Head Judge will be held in any way responsible for any interference or penalty caused by riders being unaware of having reached or exceeded their maximum wave quotas or having a wave not count due to having taken-off outside the competition area.

2.6.03              The Announcer may inform a competitor or spectators

regarding a competitor’s average wave score for any particular wave (only once all judges scores are locked in and where computer scoring is used) or wave point

average required to overtake the current leader.

2.6.04             Any interference decision as soon as called by the majority of judges will be relayed by the Head Judge to the Announcer for the decision to be broadcast to competitors as soon as possible after having been made.

2.6.05            The Announcer may also be required to make other

important calls to competitors that will take priority over all other announcements. Examples include delayed or interrupted heats and emergency situations (e.g., shark or other danger present in the area). The Announcer will make every attempt to confirm that all competitors have heard the call. Willful non-compliance with an emergency call for a competitor to return to shore will attract a fine.

2.6.06               The Announcer may ask competitors to wave one arm to

confirm they heard an announcement.

2.6.07         If a computer system is available, the Announcer has

easy access to scoring and timekeeping information and competitors are able to be clearly spotted, a system may be adopted (with prior approval of the Technical Director, Head Judge and Tour Manager) whereby competitors are able to make a limited number of hand signals requesting information from the announcer, as per the table below:

Question Signal
How much time is remaining in Heat? One hand touching another above the head.
What is my current wave count, waves remaining? One arm extended out to the side.
Scores (last ride, heat score, position, score needed etc)? One arm bent at elbow forming right-angle, palm forward
Who currently has wave priority? Both arms extended up (vertically).
Was any interference call made by the judges? Both arms crossed in front.

 

2.7      Equipment Caddies

2.7.01             One caddy per competitor per heat is allowed to assist

with the transfer of a replacement bodyboard, swimfin/s or leash to a competitor in the event that the one they are using in a heat becomes lost or damaged.

2.7.02             The caddy must wear a coloured vest in the same colour

as the competition singlet of the competitor for whom they are caddying.

2.7.03              Shore caddies must not enter the water or transfer

replacement equipment to a competitor until that competitor has returned to shore and exited the water.

2.7.04             The Head Judge may approve the use of water caddies.
Water caddies as directed by the Head Judge can position themselves in the water just within or near the boundary of the competition area (in a defined marshalling area set by the Head judge and enforced by water patrol).

2.7.05                        Where water caddies are allowed, they may paddle within
the competition area as requested by the affiliated rider in order to effect the necessary transfer of equipment, but in doing so and at all times whilst within the competition area, caddies must avoid any contact with and must not hinder in any way, any other competitor. This includes whilst a competitor is paddling, positioning themselves for or riding waves. Any such contact or hindrance will incur an interference penalty plus a fine for the rider for whom they are caddy.

2.7.06           Similarly, water caddies are not to ride any waves in the

competition area. If found to have done so (except for the purpose of assisting in a rescue) an interference penalty plus a fine for each wave ridden by the caddy will be issued to the rider for whom they were caddying.

2.7.07                       Water caddies once having transferred a board, may seek
transport from a competitor’s PWC (if permitted and

available), either to the affiliated competitor’s previously lost board or to shore. Once a competitors functional bodyboard is either retrieved or replaced, the water caddy may then be transported by the competitor’s PWC back to the caddy’s marshalling area.

2.7.08            Competitors electing not to have a caddy, must paddle or swim back to shore (or boat as may be the case) in order to access replacement equipment. They must not use any other board or equipment provided by any other caddy or person and if they do this it will result in a fine.

2.8     Maximum Wave Quota per Heat

2.8.01           The maximum number of waves that a competitor can

gain momentum on and hence be scored for in any heat will be determined prior to the heat. Information regarding maximum allowable waves will be posted in the beach marshalling and competitor’s areas and may be clarified by the Beach Marshall, Head Judge or Tour Manager as required.

2.8.02          The maximum allowable wave quota is dependent on heat

length. In a standard 20 minute heat the maximum allowable wave quota is set at 10 waves. In longer heats such as semi-finals and finals (where heats may be 25 or 30 minutes) the maximum allowable wave quota is extended to 12 or 15 waves.

2.8.03         A competitor may be given a zero score for a wave ridden in some circumstances but if so marked, this wave still counts as a scoring ride in their maximum allowable wave quota.

2.8.04         The only time the maximum allowable wave quota will be
extended will be in cases where a competitor has been given a score for a wave on which they were also interfered with by another competitor or person. In such circumstances the infringed rider will be granted an additional wave for each wave subject to a deemed interference on them.

2.8.05         Once a rider has reached their maximum allowable wave

quota they must paddle directly to shore or catch a wave directly to shore without performing any maneuvers or interfering with any other competitor. Any wave caught beyond the allowable quota will be awarded a zero score and will attract a fine per wave ridden (see Appendix A).

2.8.06       In the case of a rider exceeding their maximum wave                              quota and then taking a wave from a fellow competitor an interference call will be made on that rider.

 

2.9 Scoring Rides within Heat Time

2.9.01        If a competitor catches a wave prior to their heats’ official

commencement (as per 2.3), they will be scored a zero for that wave – referred to and recorded by the judges as an “up before”. If they ride a wave during the previous heat a fine will apply (see Appendix A).

2.9.02         If a competitor catches a wave after the official heat finish

(as per 2.3), they will be scored a zero for that wave – referred to as an “up after”. If the wave is ridden during the next heat a fine will apply (see Appendix A).

 

2.10     Scoring Rides within the Competition

Area

2.10.01        The competition area is as defined in 1.26.01 and should

offer competitors wave contestability and quality as per 1.26.02.

2.10.02          Competitors in a heat will only be scored for a wave

ridden where the point at which they took off (gained initial momentum) was clearly within the competition area, regardless of whether or not the same ride finishes outside of the area.

2.10.03     If a competitor clearly takes off outside the area and then

rides into the area, the wave shall be scored a zero and the rider (if possible) should be informed ASAP by the Announcer of the outcome.

2.10.04      If a competitor clearly takes off inside the area and then

rides outside the area, the wave will be scored as per the normal criteria, however competitors must be mindful if catching waves on the edge of an area in this manner, that the section of their ride occurring outside of the area may be completely or partially unsighted by judges. Refer also to 1.26.02.

 

2.11     Manual Tabulation of Scores

2.11.01         Manual judging sheets when used will be brought

to the tabulator after having been checked by the Head

Judge or their delegate. The Head Judge may be called on by the tabulator before tabulation is effected to clarify any illegible scores, interferences or discrepancies.

2.11.02           The Tabulator will identify and highlight (if possible with
a yellow highlighting pen) each competitor’s 2 highest scoring rides on each judge’s sheet and will transpose these scores to the lower section of the individual judge’s sheets where competitor’s top waves are recorded. The highest scored wave will be recorded in the first position, the next highest second.

2.11.03           The tabulator will also highlight any interference.

2.11.04     The top counting (2) waves for each competitor

are added together, with any deductions made as applicable for majority-called interference/s. The total is recorded for each competitor. Note that where the majority of Judges have not marked interference, a penalty deduction must not be applied to counting wave scores on the sheets of the minority judge/s who have marked interference.

2.11.05        The standard deduction for interference is a loss of 50%

of the offender’s second highest scoring wave for each judge. Where the offender has committed two interferences, the penalty deduction is applied to both their counting waves. If the offender was scored for the wave on which

they committed interference, that wave is to receive a zero (0) and cannot count as one of the rider’s top 2 scoring rides.

2.11.06           The tabulator then records a place for each competitor on

individual judge’s sheets such that the rider with the highest total for their highest counting waves is awarded “1” on that judge’s sheet, the rider with the next highest total is awarded “2” on that judge’s sheet, the rider with the next highest total is awarded “3” on that judge’s sheet, and the rider with the lowest total is awarded “4” on that judge’s sheet.

2.11.07         Where rider’s totaled highest counting waves result in a

tie between more than one rider on an individual judge’s sheet (with the exception of 2.11.08 below), the formula to assign equal placing is as follows:

Assigned Equal Placing (AEP) = Maximum Possible Error (MPE) for heat placings (the total of the number of heat placings in the heat when added together e.g., in a 4-person heat being 1+2+3+4=10) minus the Total of Untied Placings (TUP), divided by the Number of Tied Riders (NTR)

AEP = (MPE – TUP) ÷ NTR

E.g., in a 4-person heat where 3 riders are tied for 1st on a sheet, the untied rider is 4th and the formula is applied as follows:

AEP = (MPE – TUP) ÷ NTR AEP = (10 – 4) ÷ 3

AEP = 6 ÷ 3

AEP = 2

(Therefore the Assigned Equal Placing is 2 for each of the three tied riders).

 

2.11.08       In rare situations in a 4-person heat where 2 separate

ties result (one between the highest two placed riders and another between the lowest two placed riders) on an individual judge’s sheet, the formula above is applied separately for each tie as follows:

¥ For the highest two places MPE = 1+2 and NTR = 2, AEP = (MPE – TUP) ÷ NTR

AEP = (3 – 0) ÷ 2

AEP = 3 ÷ 2

AEP = 1.5

The riders tied for the highest two places are therefore awarded equal 1.5.

¥ For the lowest two places MPE = 3+4 and NTR = 2, AEP = (MPE – TUP) ÷ NTR

AEP = (7 – 0) ÷ 2

AEP = 7 ÷ 2

AEP = 3.5

The riders tied for the lowest two places are therefore awarded equal 3.5.

2.11.09           The tabulator then transfers the respective judge’s

placings from 2.11.05 (noting 2.11.06 to 2.11.08 as may apply) for each competitor to a master heat sheet.

2.11.10           The highest and lowest judge is then excluded from the
tabulation on the master heat sheet (where 5 judges are used). The highest judge on the master heat sheet (yellow shading in the below table) is anyone who has singly or jointly awarded the highest place for any particular competitor in comparison to other judges (or any judge if a unanimous placing decision for all competitors is given across the entire panel). The lowest

judge on the master heat sheet (blue shading in the below table) is anyone who has singly or jointly awarded the lowest place for any particular competitor in comparison to other judges (or any judge if a unanimous placing decision for all competitors is given across the entire panel). In the example below, all shaded placings are

excluded from tabulation.

Judge Rider 1 2 3 4 5
Red 1 1 1.5 2 2.5
White 2 2.5 1.5 1 1
Yellow 3 2.5 3 4 2.5
Blue 4 4 4 3 4

 

2.11.11        The remaining judge’s placings (representing those

closest to the average and therefore most consistent/correct) are added on the master sheet to ascertain final heat placings. In the above table they are the unshaded placings. These placings are added together for each competitor across all judges such that the rider with the lowest total places 1st in the heat, the rider with the next highest total places 2nd, the rider with the next highest total places 3rd and the rider with the highest total places 4th. See the table below which provides an example…

Judge Rider 1 2 3 4 5 Total Place
Red 1 1.5 2 4.5 1.5
White 2 1.5 1 4.5 1.5
Yellow 3 3 2.5 8.5 3
Blue 4 4 4 12 4

 

 

2.11.12                 Where there is a tie on the master heat sheet (as in the example above where Red and White have tied), the following procedure is undertaken to split it:

Judge Rider 1 2 3 4 5 Total Place
Red 1+ 1+ 1.5= 2 2.5 ++= =
White 2 2.5 1.5= 1+ 1+ =++ =
Yellow 3 2.5 3 4 2.5 8.5 3
Blue 4 4 4 3 4 12 4

In a four person heat, ties must be broken by a general judging consensus (using all judge’s comparisons of the tied riders) using a plus/minus system on the judging master sheet. A plus (+) is given for the lower score (higher place) and a minus (-) for the higher score (lower place), an equal (=) for the same place (tie). See below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If the tie still cannot be broken (as per our example above) the tabulator goes back (this is called a “count-back”) to the best wave on the tied sheet only. In our example above, Judge 3’s sheet was recounted to compare Red and White’s highest scoring individual ride. It was found that Red’s highest scoring ride was a 9.5 and White’s was an 8.0, therefore the tie is broken and Red is awarded 1st place. See the table below:

 

Judge Rider 1 2 3 4 5 Total Place
Red 1+ 1+ 1.5=1 2 2.5 1
White 2 2.5 1.5=2 1+ 1+ 2
Yellow 3 2.5 3 4 2.5 8.5 3
Blue 4 4 4 3 4 12 4

 

  • Count-backs on tied sheets are to go to the tied rider’s best waves first and if the tie is still unable to be broken in this manner, the Tabulator would then count-back to the best 3 waves, then best 4 waves and so on until the tie is broken.
  • In the case of a 3-way tie on the master sheet: use double plus (++), plus (+), equals (=) and minus (-) to separate one or more bodyboarders, then, if necessary use the regular plus/minus system to separate the other two. If still tied;
  • Use total judge’s placings to separate one or more riders, then, if necessary use the plus/minus system to separate the other two. If still tied;
  • Use total judges points for the top 2 waves (counting

back to best wave, then best 3, 4 etc) to separate one or more riders, then, if necessary use the plus/minus system to separate the other two.

  • Only unbreakable ties will be recontested.

 

2.12     Computerised Tabulation

2.12.01         The computer system should automatically calculate the

result even when ties occur, however the means by which ties are broken may be slightly different, with statistical analysis usually involving all judge’s scores and + = separations often being replaced by calculations involving standard deviations from the average score.

2.12.02         The Head Judge may intervene should there be an

amendment necessary to correct the computer’s tabulation due to incorrect data entry and will inform the Computer Operator prior to announcement of the result of any need to re-enter or correct data.

2.12.03          Manual judging sheets will always be used as back-up for

the computer scoring system. In case of a computer malfunction or power outage, manual tabulation as per 2.11 will be used. Laminated/plastic manual judging sheets used as a back-up will not be erased until the completion of the heat once it is confirmed the computerized scores have been tallied and/or published and/or saved and/or printed.

2.13    Official Protests

2.13.01           Judges’ scoresheets and Tabulators’ Tally sheets (including                         computerized versions and/or printouts of these) will be

available for scrutiny by competitors. Any protest with regard to tabulating errors must be lodged within 30 minutes of the announcement of the result, or the result as originally announced will be upheld.

2.13.02        Only a competitor has the right to protest the result of their

heat, if they believe the rules contained in Sections 2 (Competition Rules) 4 (Judging) and 5 (Interference and Priority Rules) of this document have not been correctly applied.

2.13.03        Protests must be written on an official APB protest form. A competitor wishing to protest the result of their heat is to request and can obtain a protest form directly from the Head Judge. The form once completed is to be signed and handed back to the Head Judge or Technical Director within 30 minutes of the announcement of the result. No other judge except the Head Judge is to be approached at any time regarding a protest or issues relating to the judging outcome of the competitor’s heat, or the offending bodyboarder will be fined.

2.13.04        Scores and interference decisions once finalised for

tabulation and/or published are irrevocable, regardless of what proof is made available to contradict, including video evidence.

2.13.05           The only exception to 2.13.04 will be in cases where the Head Judge deems that the majority of the panel has completely missed a scoring ride or interference occurring entirely within the competition area and within the heat’s official running time. In this case evidence must be provided to categorically support this. Such evidence will be accessed by the Head Judge immediately on protest and a final decision (either to uphold or change a result) will be announced within 30 minutes of the protest.

2.13.06           Where any “hearsay” evidence is provided by any witness,
the weight of such evidence will be determined (as having from greater to lesser importance) by the nature of the person providing it in the following order:

  1. APB Head Judge (off-panel).
  2. APB Technical Director
  3. APB Touring International Judge (off-duty)
  4. APB Region/Local Judge (off-duty)
  5. Tour Manager, Beach Marshall, Announcer
  6. Water Patrol (on duty)
  7. Higher placed competitors from that heat if in support of the protest (conceding potential loss of place)
  8. APB Authorised Photographers
  9. Other key event staff
  10. The competitor subject of the protest
  11. Competitor’s entourage and members of the public

2.14   Determining heat placings and

progression.

2.14.01          Once a clear result has been established by the

Tabulator or computer, the final heat placings and progressions are recorded for presentation to the Announcer.

2.14.02                    The heat winner is awarded 1st place, then comes 2nd, 3rd

and 4th as may apply.

2.14.03      In one-on-one format, the heat winner progresses where progression occurs.

2.14.04      In 4 person formats, the top 2 place getters (1st and 2nd)

generally progress to the next round unless specified otherwise by the Tour Manager in consultation with the Technical Director (in case of altered formats such as repechage (requalify) or where other formats are being used).

2.15    Announcement of Results

2.15.01          An announcement of heat placings will be made ASAP

following tabulation. The Head Announcer or their delegate will call the result from last to first place and indicating the progression of riders.

2.15.02        Announcement of results of finals placings may

be withheld until the presentation ceremony (normally held at the event site), in order that trophies may be awarded and a media spectacle created in front of a crowd.

2.16    Heat Fixing and Betting

2.16.01         Competitor involvement in any form of gambling, where money is taken or promised in return for speculating on or predicting the outcome of any heat or competition, whether using legal or illegal bookmakers, is expressly forbidden at APB events. Contravention of this rule will result in heavy penalties (see Appendix A).

2.16.02          Any competitor found to have placed a bet or received

money in relation to a bet on the outcome of competition at an APB event will be fined, disqualified from current competition (with loss of any rankings points and prizemoney that might have applied) in an event and will be banned from future competition for a period of up to 2 years (the length of ban is to be at the discretion of the APB Board).

2.16.03         Any competitor found to have organised gambling in

relation to the outcome of competition at an APB event, including any involvement in collusion or fixing of results, will be disqualified from current competition (with loss of any rankings points and prizemoney that might have applied) in an event and will be banned from future competition for a period of up to 5 years at the discretion of the APB Board.

2.17    Water Photographers

2.17.01           The APB Tour Manager will issue permits prior to the

event to a limited number of photographers and/or videographers who will be permitted at certain times toenter the competition area for the purpose of documenting or recording images of the competition.

2.17.02                    Water photographers and videographers will be selected
on the basis of merit and they must submit an appropriate portfolio and resume regarding their professional experience before being selected and granted a permit to film at any events.

2.17.03           Photographers must submit their requests for water time

to the Tour Manager prior to the commencement of competition on each day. The Tour Manager in consultation with the Head Judge will approve the scheduling of particular photographer’s water time to shoot/film particular heats.

2.17.04        Unless part of the Event Licensing Agreement, works

recorded will remain the exclusive property of the APB for a period of no less than 10 years and the use of any footage or photographs will be commissioned from individual photographers or videographers on a per use basis or as per agreement with the APB.

2.17.05            Apart from those granted permit by the APB, no other

water photographers are authorised to enter the competition area.

2.17.06        Strict guidelines will be imposed to ensure that under no

circumstances do any water photographers cause any hindrance to competitors that might affect their scoring potential in the competition. This will include limiting the number of photographers at any one time that may be present in the competition area (normally a maximum of 2 water photographers will be allowed simultaneously and they must wear an assigned colour rash vest to signify that they are approved. These can be collected from the Beach Marshall who will hold a roster for water photographers).

2.18    Water Patrol / Rescue Management

2.18.01           Use of PWC by Water Patrol will be subject to the general

conditions for use of PWC as per Section 3.

2.18.02                   Where Water Patrol staff are commissioned for an APB

event they will be identified clearly by vests indicating “Water Patrol”.

2.18.03          Water Patrol staff must hold current Surf Rescue,

resuscitation and First Aid qualifications in order to conduct the role, they must be suitably qualified.

2.18.04         Water Patrol must at all times whilst patrolling the

competition area, carry and be competent in the use of a waterproof 2-way radio receiver/transmitter. An open channel must be maintained on this device in order that Water Patrol may communicate freely with both the Head Judge and Tour Manager as required.

2.18.05          Water Patrol from time to time may be called upon to

attempt to clear the competition area of free-surfers or other people who may present an impediment or affect scoring potential of competitors. In such instances the call to direct Water Patrol to take action may only be made by either the Head Judge or Tour Manager, unless the Water Patrol identifies a clear issue in this respect. Should such a call be made or decision taken by Water Patrol, they will make every effort to sternly although politely advise any persons of the rights and obligations under event permit/licence requiring such persons to vacate the competition area immediately.

2.18.06           Where a person refuses to follow the direction of Water
Patrol to clear the area, a call will be made to any Local Authorities as appropriate to effect clearance of the person/s in violation of the competition area rules. If the person refusing to leave the area is a competitor in the event who is free surfing, disqualification if still

competing (with loss of any rankings points and

prizemoney that might have applied), a fine and future ban from competition will be imposed.

2.18.07        Water Patrol from time to time may be called upon or

make a decision to attempt to rescue/remove from imminent danger any competitor identified by event staff (or other witness) whose safety or life is at risk. The APB will not be held liable for any failed attempt by Water Patrol to save a competitor’s life or save them from harm although every reasonable attempt will be made to do so.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.0        PERSONAL WATER CRAFT (PWC)

3.1      General Conditions

3.1.01          PWC will only be allowed for use at APB events where the

risk associated with their use has been managed and forms a part of the APB Licensing Agreement for the event. The event/promoter must have the correct public liability and personal injury insurance in place regarding PWC and any applicable permits required under local laws regarding use of PWC must have been obtained.

3.1.02             The use of PWC (for any purpose) by Water Patrol or other qualified pilots must be approved prior to the competition on any particular day by the Head Judge, Technical Director and Tour Manager (or majority of the three).

3.1.03          Approval will only be granted to licensed, experienced

pilots (those who have had extensive experience with tow-ins and tow-outs of bodyboarders) who also hold current first aid and surf rescue/CPR/ECC qualifications or certificates from a recognised authority.

3.1.04             Qualified pilots must submit their resumes with details of

their experience, as well as a copy of their current licences and certificates to the APB if they want to work as PWC Water Patrol or PWC Pilot at APB events. Only those who apply to the APB in this manner will be short listed for potential selection for these positions. Selection will be based on merit and applications assessed by the APB Tour Manager.

3.2       Rescue and Safety Issues

3.2.01            PWC will be used where possible to assist in the prompt

transfer to shore or other safe area of any competitor whose personal safety has been seriously compromised or whose life is at risk. In such circumstances a PWC may enter any part of the competition area.

3.2.02           PWC Water Patrol if involved in rescue will maintain 2-

way radio communication with the key event staff on the beach so that medical attention may be sought by local authorities ASAP if it is required.

3.2.03                     Where a rescue is being undertaken with the view to

returning a competitor to shore, other competitors in the heat whilst riding any waves must avoid collision with the

PWC, rescue personnel and injured or at-risk bodyboarder/person. It is likely that the heat will need to be stopped under such circumstances and restarted at a later time.

3.2.04        If any PWC collides with another PWC or competitor and

injury results the Head Judge may determine that the heat be placed on hold in order that medical attention be sought/provided to the affected person/s and the heat may be resumed at a later time.

 

3.3     Transfer of Competitors

3.3.01           PWC will only be approved to be used in non-tow-in

events to transfer competitors to the take-off zone in the following circumstances:

  • In extreme conditions (i.e., in very large, powerful waves that are either closing out and/or forcing all riders inside or into strong rips leading away from the take-off zone and/or where few clearly defined deep channels exist as safe paddling routes back to the take-off zone);
  • Where the paddle back to the take-off zone is impractically long (i.e., where it would take all competitors more than 5 minutes to either reach the take-off zone from the start of pre-paddle time or to return to the take-off zone after having finished a ride).
  • Where the number of PWC simultaneously operating does not create a safety concern in itself – this will be determined by the Head Judge and in most cases, the number of PWC allowed to operate in the competition area will be limited to 2.
  • Where each competitor in a heat has access to their own dedicated PWC in good working order and of equally comparable performance/power and facility (unless the Head Judge approves the use of one PWC per heat).

3.3.02            PWC if used must not cause wake that distorts or

potentially affects the quality of any waves breaking in the competition area. Hence the pilot must navigate a route in such a way as to skirt around the competition area and not directly through it when travelling between

the inside pick-up and outside drop-off points.

3.3.03             The Head Judge will determine the drop-off and pick-up
points for PWC. Buoys may be placed to mark these areas.

3.3.04        The outside drop-off point will be situated beyond the

take-off zone but no more than 30 seconds paddle away from it.

3.3.05            The inside pick-up point will be determined after assessing conditions on a daily basis, however, will generally be at a point just inside where the last rideable sections of the set waves in a heat would end. The PWC Pilot must sit in deep water to the side of the competition area and may move in to the inside pick-up point once a rider finishes their wave in order to collect them and return them immediately to the outside drop-off point. If the rider fails to make (i.e., falls short of) the inside pick-up point after completing a ride the PWC Pilot is not allowed to navigate or move further into the competition area seaward of the inside pick-up point. The rider must either paddle (or catch a wave that will be scored) in to the inside pick-up area, or paddle themselves back out to the line-up. The only exception will be where rescue is required as per section 3.2.

3.4          Transfer of Caddies

3.4.01                        Water caddies once having transferred a board, may seek

transport from a competitor’s PWC (if permitted and available), either to the affiliated competitor’s previously lost board or to shore. Once a competitor’s functional bodyboard is either retrieved or replaced, the water caddy may then be transported by the competitor’s PWC back to the caddy’s marshalling area.

3.5     Priority for PWC

3.5.01                   Where PWC are used in one-on-one priority heats (see

Section 5.5), they will substitute for the riders themselves.

3.5.02             The Head Judge will be solely responsible to determine
priority of PWC as they see fit, including based on any determination of advantage resulting from pilot competence, mechanical error in or breakdown of a PWC.

3.5.03                PWC must not overtake each other whilst picking-up or dropping off competitors.

 

4.0        JUDGING

4.1      Panel Composition and Selection for APB World Tour Events

4.1.01             An APB Head Judge plus a minimum of 6 scoring (panel) judges are required at every APB event.

4.1.02           Make up of the scoring judges depends on the star rating of the event. The composition of the International Touring Judges will increase as the event star rating increases. However for 4 star and above events 4 international judges preferably from a different APB Region than the hosting region and preferably of different nationality to the other judges.

4.1.03         International Touring Judges will be selected by the APB Judging Coordinator and then confirmed by a judging selection committee.

4.1.04         International Touring Judges must have attained their BIO Level 3 Bodyboarding Judge Accreditation or equivalent ISA Level 3 qualification and will be selected based on their performance record as judges at APB International and national events with emphasis placed on recent performance (i.e., over the past 12-24 months).

4.1.05         The APB Judging Coordinator will maintain judge’s performance records and a register of International Touring Judges from which a short list will be drawn to select judges for various events on the APB World Tour. Those Judges ranking highest from time to time (also pursuant to 4.1.02) will be the first to be considered for panel selection as International Touring Judges.

4.1.06            Judges who have never previously acted as International Touring Judges must have extensive recent experience as a panel judge at APB Regional events.

4.1.07       The APB Judging Coordinator will confirm the selection of International Touring Judges at least 4

weeks prior to event commencement. The APB Tour Manager will then coordinate with the Event Director and/or Promoter regarding the booking of and payment for return airfares, all necessary transfers and accommodation for the International Touring Judges in relation to the event. These must be finalized within 1 month of the commencement of the event (with proof of ticketing) as per the APB Event Sanctioning Requirements. All details and itineraries are then to be promptly forwarded to the International Touring Judges via their email.

4.1.08             The remainder of the panel will be made up of recognized Regional Judges who are selected by the APB Judging Coordinator usually after consultation with the Host Country’s APB Region Head Judge. They will preferably have had extensive experience judging at APB Regional level events.

4.2      Payments and Conditions for Judges

4.2.01             Payments to judges are set by the APB and may be

revised/updated from time to time at the discretion of the APB. They are all available in the Event Sanctioning Requirements document.

4.2.02             Payments will be administered to Judges via the APB Technical Director or Tour Manager on completion of the event.

4.2.03               Accommodation for the Head Judge and International

Touring Judges should be a minimum of 3-star. It should be fully serviced (regularly cleaned and inclusive of breakfasts, dinners and refreshments) or at least partly serviced (i.e., fresh sheets, towels and toiletries provided on a regular basis). This accommodation is to be paid for by the promoter. It should be located as close as possible to the event.

4.2.04             Accommodation for Local Judges may be required

(unless they reside within 45 minute’s travelling time of the event site) and is to be organised and paid for by the Tour Manager or Promoter. It may be separate to the accommodation for International Touring Judges and may be of a lower standard (minimum 2-star), however, must still offer clean linen and basic amenities and be located close to the event. Local Judges are responsible to gather the details of and confirm arrangements in relation to this accommodation from the Tour Manager.

4.2.05              At the event site, judges will be provided for as per the applicable detail in the Event Equipment and Services (found within the APB Event Sanctioning Requirements).

4.2.06           Judges are to be supplied with breakfast, lunch and

dinner on the event days only.

4.2.07             Judges are to ensure that they have their own personal supply of items such as hats (unless provided by the Promoter or APB), sunscreen, suitable clothing for a variety of weather conditions, and a towel (some judges like to place this on their seat for comfort).

4.3     Head Judge

4.3.01            Reports to the Tour Manager and works with the

Technical Director, Head Announcer and Beach Marshall.

  1. 3 . 0 2 Assembles the group of local judges who will work with the APB touring judges at an event.

4.3.03             Positions the priority disc and be responsible for priority.

4.3.04             Operates the head judge computer terminal where used.

4.3.05            Coordinates the judging panel and assists judges to

correctly apply the Judging Criteria and Interference Rules.

4.3.06         Indicates to individual judges any unacceptable deviation from the average score so that adjustment may occur.

  1. 3 . 07 Ensures an environment conducive to effective             judging, free from noise and distraction.

4.3.08            Assigns the scoring judge’s their judge numbers and

schedules the panel for judging and spotting duties. A daily roster will be made accessible to all scoring judges on commencement of competition each day.

4.3.09                       Monitors all judge’s performance and records and deliversperformance appraisals to judges individually or during team discussion at times as required.

4.3.10             May overrule the judging panel’s decision concerning

interference only where the majority of judges did not see the incident.

4.4      International Touring Judges

4.4.01             Touring Judges report to the Head Judge.

4.4.02             They are selected by the APB judging Coordinator and are the highest ranked and most experienced judges in the world at any time and are the next most senior judges after the Head Judge. Their opinions, knowledge and judging expertise are highly valued in the panel and most will be Head Judges in their respective APB regions.

4.4.03         Interpret and correctly apply both the Interference Rules
and the Judging Criteria at an event.

4.4.04              Operate computer scoring terminals and record scores

manually (i.e., on paper) as required.

4.4.05            Provides scoring consistency in a panel and in judging

outcomes in general from event to event.

4.4.06         In the event of any rules dispute, in conjunction with the Head Judge, an appointed Touring Judge can act also as an event referee and determine the final and correct application of the rules in a particular situation.

4.5     Regional Judges and Spotters

4.5.01                Regional Judges are selected by the APB Judging Coordinator in consultation with the APB Regional Head Judge in that region to supplement the Touring Judges at an event.

4.5.02                Apply the interpretations of both the Interference Rules and the Judging Criteria, under close supervision and instruction from the Head Judge and are assisted greatly by the Touring Judges.

4.5.03                On completion of the event, the highest performing Regional Judges will be selected by the Head Judge and Touring Judges as the best approved local judges. They may then be considered for inclusion on future APB World Tour Judging Panels.

4.5.04           A dedicated spotter should ideally be employed at all APB World Tour Events.

4.5.05                The spotter works closely with the Judges and performs a very specific job which is in many cases vital to the success of the panel. A spotter constantly watches all of competitors in a heat, and advises judges, according to the colours of the competitor’s competition singlets, when they are paddling, taking off, riding or holding a position in the lineup. It is up to the spotter to be aware of and inform the judges of the relative positions of all the competitors in heats.

4.5.06           The spotter works to a roster under the direction of the Head Judge.

4.5.07           During heats held in excessive sunlight glare or poor light, and/or where competitors by virtue of conditions are a long distance from an immobile judging area or scaffold, a spotter may be required to position themselves away from the judges and closer to the riders or at a different angle from the riders than the judges, from where they can more easily distinguish rider’s singlet colours. In such cases the spotter may be required to communicate and/or confirm spotting information (as per 4.5.04 above) with the Head Judge and/or panel by means of a   2-way radio.

 

4.6     Judging Criteria

4.6.01             Unless an APB World Tour Event is a specialty event (e.g., wave pool, flow-rider, big-air, big wave or tow-in), the standard judging criteria to be used is as stated below:

  • A rider must perform radical controlled maneuvers in the critical section/s of a wave with Speed, Power and Flow to maximize their scoring potential.
  • Innovative/technical riding as well as variety of repertoire (maneuvers) and single major moves will be taken into account when rewarding points for waves ridden.
  • Multiple-element aerial maneuvers with a high degree of difficulty will attract the highest possible scores if completed cleanly.
  • The rider who meets these criteria and executes  maneuvres with the maximum degree of difficulty and commitment on their waves shall be rewarded with the highest scores”.

4.6.02           Length of ride and numbers of maneuvres performed

while not directly part of the criteria, may be aspects that influence scoring potential. If the competition break is a very long wave that produces several critical sections of comparable size or quality over a long distance it will provide riders with the opportunity to complete more than one major maneuver that has a high degree of difficulty. No matter how many maneuvers are done on a wave, it is important to remember that only those with high degree of difficulty done in critical sections are contributing to the majority of the rider’s overall score.

4.6.03            No other form of wave riding in prone division will be                                                            scored except in the prone position.

4.6.04         The following shall be applied when scoring a rider in the Drop Knee stance:

  • Balance, control, displacement of water as well as the angle of attack are all indications of the rider’s adherence to the judging criteria.
  • Dysfunctional riding (e.g., DK rolls landed prone, multiple spins, spinning out of turns to regain balance, double-knee riding, stand-up riding) is not high scoring as it falls outside of the criteria.

4.7     Scoring Range

4.7.01         Individual waves are scored from 0.0 to 10.0.

4.7.02        Judges may within the established range use the following number of increments (where “X” = any number that applies in the range):

  • 0, X.3, X.5 and X.8
  • 0, X.2, X.5 and X.7
  • 0, X.2, X.3, X.5, X.7, and X.8

4.7.03             0.0 is given only awarded as a scoring ride where a wave is ridden:

  • Before heat commencement (Up-Before).
  • In excess of a rider’s maximum wave quota.
  • After the heat has finished if the rider was still attempting take-off on the siren and has performed maneuvers with intention of being scored (Up-After).
  • Prone or without having ever attained the full DK stance on the entire length of a ride in a DK Division
  • Anytime that a DK stance is attempted in a prone heat will result in a zero to that rider. No DK rides will be scored in a prone heat.
  • By a competitor who has been disqualified due to having committed a second interference in a heat, regardless of whether or not they would normally have had some wave quota remaining.

4.7.04          “10.0” as part of the range indicates a perfect score and

that the rider has in the opinion of the judge fully met the judging criteria on a single wave and almost certainly in comparison to any other rides from any competitor in that heat and probably in comparison to all other rides from any competitor in that round. However on a day it is not impossible and not to be discouraged that more than one “10” is awarded by a judge, if they believe it is warranted. The use of a few “10.0’s” by a judge in a single event indicates they are correctly using the complete judging scale. Judges who never score “10” in an event are possibly restricting their scale and introducing a lower margin for error when comparing and evaluating scores.

4.8      Recording of Scores

4.8.01               Manual Judging sheets are used for all heats.

4.8.02          Scoresheets are to legibly completed and all heat and

judge details input are to be written as required.

4.8.03          The complete score including any increments before and after the decimal point must be recorded on manual score sheets and into the computer system.

4.8.04      Scores are to be placed wholly within the box or into the field that indicates the correct numbered wave to which the score relates for that competitor.

4.8.05          If a mistake is made on a manual judging sheet prior to a score having been entered into the computer system (or where no computer is being used) a correction may be made by the scoring judge (in the same field) – with the initial of the judge appearing beside the change to indicate they have amended a mistake. The Head Judge must be asked for an average score for that wave and comparisons with other waves and then advised of any corrections if the judge still needs to change a manual sheet.

4.8.06          If a correction is made on a manual sheet after a score has been entered into the computer system, the Head Judge must be advised immediately and is the only person who can over-ride a computer score. This will usually only be in situations where waves have been missed. Scores falling within an acceptable range once entered into the computer must not be changed. If a requested change to a score entered into the computer system is deemed acceptable by the Head Judge and changed on the computer system, the change must also be recorded on the manual judging sheet (in the same field) – with the initial of the judge appearing beside the change to indicate they have amended a mistake.

4.8.07         If any correction is made on a finals sheet, and there is no room to write and initial any change on a sheet, it must be re-written by that judge before being tabulated.

4.8.08                       Where a judge completely or partially misses a ride, the Head Judge is to be advised immediately and will provide a score for that judge according to their scale. This will be arrived at considering the average score for the missed ride across the remaining judges and a further comparison of that ride (where scored) with other key rides already scored by the majority of judges.

 

 

4.9      Recording of Interferences

4.9.01             An interference will be marked as a triangle around the offender’s score or between scores (as may be the case) on each judge’s score sheet with an arrow drawn from the triangle to the affected score (or between scores as may be the case) of the rider subjected to the interference.

4.9.02             The triangle is placed:

  • Around the offending rider’s score for that wave if the offender committed the interference whilst riding the
  • On the line between the offender’s scores in the appropriate position if the offender committed the interference whilst paddling for the wave but did not gain momentum on it.

4.9.03             The arrow leads:

  • To the score of the affected rider where that rider gained momentum on the wave (and was scored), or
  • To the line between scores in the appropriate position if caused by paddling or hindrance but where the affected rider did not gain momentum on the wave.

4.9.04             The Head Judge may call interference if the majority of judges did not see the incident and their call will contribute towards the majority call.

4.9.05             Once a majority of judges have called interference on a rider that rider must be penalised and the decision is irrevocable.

4.9.06       The rider who received an interference call against

them, if desiring an explanation of the decision should approach the Technical Director in the first instance and request an appointment be made for them with the Head Judge regarding the decision. This request must be made within 30 minutes of the heat ending and in writting. No other judge or official may be approached about the decision or a fine will be applied.

 

 

4.10    Replay Systems

4.10.0             All rides from Round of 32 APB World Tour heats to finals are generally filmed by a camera operator who has a good position/angle. Rides are usually televised in real time via the internet. A replay system may be available for judges whereby competitors’ filmed rides are replayed (automatically or via request from the Head Judge) on a screen for the benefit of judge’s further appraisal, which may occur prior to judges allocating scores and assessing interference situations. Competitors understand that the use of technology which permits the reviewing of rides or situations by judges is for the purpose of establishing a fairer and more informed outcome, as judges are able to re-appraise a ride following their initial view of the ride in real time. Judges are therefore able to fine tune the application of the judging criteria for the benefit of the judging outcome.

4.10.02                    Judges are not to rely on the use of a replay system in order to determine scores for rides, however, and must always seek to apply the criteria based on the initial view of competitors rides in real time, as viewed from the judging tower/scaffold.

4.10.03      Footage used for the benefit of judges via a replay system is not to be made available for scrutiny by competitors and cannot be used by competitors as evidence to support an official protest, although it may be used by the Head Judge to support the final judgement decision regarding an official protest.

4.11    Judging – Miscellaneous Conditions

4.11.01           Scoring judges are to be separated by partitions so that they are not able to see the scores of other judges, are free from distractions and able to remain focused on the competition area.

4.11.02                    Where a computer system is used, judges are to be correctly instructed on the use by the Head Judge or Computer Operator as appropriate.

4.11.03           Scoring Judges are to refer to the daily roster provided by the Head Judge. They are to adhere to breaks and rostered heats as scheduled.

4.11.04           As a courtesy measure to the rest of the panel, a judge coming off a break should return to the judging area and be ready to re-enter the panel or commence spotting duties (as may apply) at least a minute before the next scheduled judging or spotting heat commences.

4.11.05           Judges are to remain on the panel as rostered for the whole event and must not dismiss their duties without an appropriate reason (e.g., verified medical condition).

4.11.06           Scoring judges are not to discuss any scores or any competitor’s chances of winning, with any person, regardless of having witnessed rides either during panel duty or whilst off duty (during heat breaks).

4.11.07           At no time will a judge’s score be influenced by personal relationships with any competitor or competitors or by having a relationship with any sponsor of an event, competitor or judge.

4.11.08           At no time will a judge accept any payment or bribe from any person in relation to the performance of his official duties. A judge must only accept payment for judging at completion of an event (or at such time after having met his full judging obligations for an event), from the Technical Director or Head Judge as agreed prior to the event and at the agreed rate.

4.11.09        No judge will purposefully distract, by talking or by other means, another judge from performing official judging duties whilst a heat is in progress.

4.11.10        Contravention of conditions 4.11.05 to 4.1.09 can result in immediate expulsion from the judging panel and/or a ban from judging future APB events as deemed appropriate by the APB International Judging Coordinator.

 

 

 

5.0        INTERFERENCE AND PRIORITY RULES

5.1     Basic Rule

5.1.01          The first rider to gain momentum from the wave shall be deemed to have unconditional wave possession. The rider must have an unimpeded path across the face of the wave in the direction they have chosen to ride.

5.1.02          If two or more riders gain momentum at the same time on the same wave and wish to ride the wave in the same direction, the rider on the inside shall have right of way.

5.1.03     In priority heats an interference penalty will mean that the offending rider will only be scored on one wave.

5.1.04       In priority heats any double interferences will mean

that all riders will only be scored on one wave.

5.1.05         (The penalty deduction is repeated here from section 2.11.05) The standard deduction for interference is a loss of 50% of the offender’s second scoring wave for each judge. Where the offender has committed two interferences, the penalty deduction (50%) is applied to both their counting waves. If the offender was scored for the wave on which they committed interference, that wave is to receive a zero (0) and cannot count as one of the rider’s top 2 scoring rides.

 

 

5.2       Right of Way in and Non-priority

Heats

5.2.01         It is the responsibility of the judge to determine which

bodyboarder has the inside position based on whether the wave is a superior right or left hander.

5.2.02        If, at the initial point of take-off neither right nor left can be deemed superior, then the right of way will go to the first bodyboarder with momentum in their chosen direction.

5.2.03                       When there is only one available direction on any given

wave, the bodyboarder on the inside shall have unconditional right of way for the entire duration of that wave, unless another rider is considered to have gained momentum first.

5.2.04         If there is a single, well defined peak with both a left and right available at the initial point of take-off and neither the right nor the left can be deemed superior, then the right-of-way will go to the first bodyboarder who makes a definite turn or commences a maneuver in their chosen direction. A second bodyboarder may go in the opposite direction on the same wave, without incurring a penalty, providing they do not interfere with the first bodyboarder who has established right of way (they may not cross the path of the first bodyboarder in order to gain the opposite side of the peak unless doing so without hindering the bodyboarder with right of way). If two bodyboarders gain momentum simultaneously on a split peak and ride the wave in opposite directions without crossing paths or hindering the other rider, there will be no interference.

5.2.05             There may be cases where one swell forms two separate, defined peaks or waves that commence to break some distance apart but converge on each other and eventually meet at a single point. Although two bodyboarders may each have inside position on those respective peaks, the bodyboarder who gains 1st momentum on the wave shall be deemed to have wave possession. The second bodyboarder to catch the wave will be scored for their ride as per the normal criteria, but must give way by either cutting back, ducking out or pulling off the wave before hindering the right of way of the other bodyboarder otherwise an interference will apply against them.

5.2.06    Pursuant to (5.2.05), either bodyboarder may be totally unsure who has established wave possession through first momentum. Regardless of that possibility, should the second momentum rider force the first momentum rider to take evasive action or to voluntarily discontinue their ride by aggressively charging the end section, the second momentum rider will be subject to an interference penalty.

 

5.2.07         If two bodyboarders gain momentum simultaneously on a wave with two separate, converging peaks that eventually meet at one point, then:

  1. If both bodyboarders give way by cutting back, ducking out or pulling off the wave before hindering the right of way of the other then no interference will r
  2. If one rider’s scoring potential is affected by the other rider forcing them to take evasive action or to voluntarily discontinue their own ride by aggressively charging the end section, the aggressor at the point of hindrance may be subject to an interference penalty, depending on the judge’s discretion.
  3. If neither bodyboarder gives way, by cutting back or ducking out or pulling off the wave before hindering the right of way of the other, then both share the responsibility for any confrontation or hindrance and a double interference will be called (i.e., both riders will be deemed to have interfered).

5.3      Snaking Interference

 

5.3.01             The rider on the wave first, that is, the rider who reaches the wave first, begins paddling and gains momentum on it first, has possession of that wave, even if a rider who subsequently takes off later is closer to the breaking part of the wave or takes off in the white water behind the rider who had first momentum. The second momentum rider will receive a snaking interference penalty.

5.3.02          If a bodyboarder has possession of a wave and another

bodyboarder subsequently paddles around him to attempt to gain priority and interferes with the first bodyboarder, they will also be called for a snaking interference and receive an appropriate penalty.

 

5.4 – Paddling Interference – Non-priority

 

5.4.01          In four person heats or non-priority 2-person heats, a

bodyboarder who already has either already established first momentum, or paddling unimpeded should gain first momentum must not be excessively hindered or hassled by another bodyboarder paddling for, on or through the same wave.

5.4.02               A paddling interference will be called where:

  1. A rider paddling for a wave makes contact with or forces the inside bodyboarder who unimpeded should gain first momentum, to change their line while paddling to catch the wave (e.g., causing an overly late take-off or one where the affected rider is forced too far inside to make the initial section), resulting an obvious loss of scoring potential.
  2. A rider paddling for, through or on a wave, obviously causes a section to break down (which would not otherwise have occurred) on or in front of a rider who has established momentum on that wave and the result is clear loss of scoring potential.
  3. A competitor without momentum continues to paddle for a wave on which another competitor has already clearly established momentum and therefore wave possession.
  4. A bodyboarder paddling towards the line -up or in front of another rider taking off, directly hinders the line of that rider who either already has or is about to gain first momentum, affecting their scoring potential (including where collision results and the affected rider does not gain momentum). It must be clear that the affected competitor would otherwise have used that part of the wave obstructed by the paddling competitor at the point of hindrance, in order to take-off (gain momentum), or to set up or perform a scoring maneuver unimpeded and without any loss of scoring potential.
  5. Where a paddling collision occurs on a split peak (where the potential for one rider to gain first momentum is in contention) and the result is that neither rider catches the wave but both prevent the other from taking-off and therefore jointly affect one another’s scoring potential, a double paddling interference will be called.

5.5      Priority Situations (one-on-one heats)

5.5.01             A Priority system must be used in scheduled one-on-one rounds, whereby riders establish priority by being beyond or to the side of the take-off zone under direction of the Head Judge.

5.5.02             The Head Judge will determine who has priority in one‑

on-one formats and will indicate this by changing the colour of a priority disc to coincide with the colour of the competition vest worn by the rider who has priority.

5.5.03             The priority disc must be situated at one end of the
judging area where it is clearly visible by the competitors in the heat in progress. It must be easily accessible so that it may be changed immediately as priority changes, either by or under direction of the Head Judge.

5.5.04          Normally there will be no priority once a heat commences until one rider gains momentum on a wave (with all non-priority interference rules applying until this point), at which time the remaining rider will be deemed to have automatic first priority.

5.5.05             Pursuant to (5.5.04), at APB MWT events at beach breaks, a coin toss between competitors will be conducted by the beach marshal with the highest seeded rider making the call. This person has the option to defer and make the other rider call. Whoever wins the coin toss can choose to have first or second priority. The result must be communicated to the head judge.

5.5.06            The rider with first priority has ultimate wave
possession on their chosen wave in either direction. The ride with second priority may surf the wave in the opposite direction as the first priority rider and providing the second priority rider does not hinder the first then the wave will be scored.

5.5.07                      Where one rider holds first priority, the other rider may

establish and be awarded second priority, which will revert to first priority as soon as the other rider with first priority loses it. No further priority (e.g., third or fourth etc.) may be gained in this manner.

5.5.08                        Wave priority is lost by a competitor as soon as they gain momentum on a wave, or paddle for and miss a wave. This loss of priority is determined by the head judge and is based on watching similar paddling situations thousands of times. The loss of priority can be defined as gaining momentum on a wave by either catching or paddling for and missing, but still travelling towards the shore line. In this case priority reverts to the other competitor only if they had already established second priority. Otherwise neither rider is deemed to have priority.

5.5.09         If neither bodyboarder has priority, no priority discs are indicated and the normal non-priority interference rules will determine right of way, including that riders may catch the same wave in opposite directions without interference. These rules will apply until priority is re­established as per 5.5.01.

5.5.10             A bodyboarder cannot lose second priority by paddling for and missing a wave (when no momentum is gained) but if the bodyboarder gains momentum in any way, they will be scored for that wave and lose second priority.

5.5.11                       When a rider with first priority paddles for and misses a

wave, the other rider will get automatic first priority if they held second priority at the time. If they then paddle for and also miss the same wave, both riders will be deemed to have lost priority, regardless of there having been insufficient time to change the priority disc.

5.5.12             The rider with first priority must not position themselves in front of the other rider to deliberately block them from catching a wave or they will lose priority. Prior to loosing priority a verbal warning will be issued to notify the rider with priority that they are close to turning over the priority.

5.5.13             Similarly where in the opinion of the Head Judge a rider with first priority places themselves in the takeoff zone to “sit on” the other rider and prevent them from catching a wave, that rider will also lose priority. Prior to loosing priority a verbal warning will be issued to notify the rider with priority that they are close to turning over the priority.

5.5.14             Priority interference may be called individually by the

Head Judge only if the majority of the judging panel does not see the incident.

5.5.15      If it is impossible to establish who has priority, no priority will be given unless the bodyboarders in the heat, when asked, agree that only one has priority. If neither agrees, then no priority will be given and once the first wave from then on has been ridden, the second bodyboarder will get automatic priority for any other wave they choose.

5.5.16           In all cases where a dispute results from a malfunction of the priority system, the APB Head Judge and Technical Director will arbitrate.

 

5.6        Priority Situations (4 and 3 person heats)

5.6.01             A priority system can be used in 4 or 3 person heats, whereby riders establish priority by being the first to reach, or go beyond, or to the side of, the main take-off zone under direction of the Head Judge.

5.6.02             Where surfers reach the line-up at the same time, priority will go to the surfer who did not have the last priority.

5.6.03             The Head Judge (or Priority Judge) will determine who has priority in heats and may consult with the judging panel for close calls. This priority will be indicated by changing the colours of the priority discs, lights or flags to coincide with the colours of the competition vest worn by the riders who have priority.

5.6.04             The priority discs, lights or flags must be situated at one end of the judging area where it is clearly visible by the competitors in the heat in progress. It must be easily accessible so that it may be changed immediately as priority changes, either by or under direction of the Head Judge (Priority Judge).

5.6.05             Normally there will be no priority once a heat

commences until one rider gains momentum on a wave (with all non-priority interference rules applying until this point), at which time the remaining riders will be deemed to share automatic first priority.

5.6.06             The rider with first priority has ultimate wave possession.

5.6.07              Once a ride has been caught then all remaining riders will share equal first priority and the first rider will move to fourth priority.

5.6.08                       Wave priority is lost by a competitor as soon as they

gain momentum on a wave, or paddle for and miss a wave. This loss of priority is determined by the head judge and is based on watching similar paddling situations thousands of times. The loss of priority can be defined as gaining momentum on a wave by either catching or paddling for and missing, but still travelling towards the shore line. In this case, priority reverts to another competitor only if they had already established second priority. Then the riders in third and fourth priority all move up one place and the rider that lost first priority automatically gets fourth priority.

5.6.09         If no competitors have priority, no priority discs are

indicated and the normal non-priority interference rules will determine right of way. These rules will apply until priority is re-established as per 5.5.01.

5.6.10           A bodyboarder will lose second priority by paddling

for and missing a wave (when no momentum is gained), and if the bodyboarder gains momentum in any way, they will be scored for that wave and loose second priority and automatically go to fourth priority.

5.6.11                       When a rider with first priority paddles for and misses

a wave, the other riders will get automatic first, second and third priority if they held priority at the time. If this second priority rider then paddles for and also miss the same wave, both riders (in this situation) will be deemed to have lost priority, regardless of there having been insufficient time to change the priority disc. The rider in first priority will go to third and the rider that was holding second will go to fourth pushing the original third and fourth into the new first and second priority.

5.6.12             The rider with first priority must not position

themselves in front of the other riders to deliberately block them from catching a wave or they will lose priority. Prior to loosing priority a verbal warning will be issued to notify the rider with priority that they are close to turning over the priority.

5.6.13            Similarly where in the opinion of the Head Judge a

rider with first priority places himself or herself in the take off zone to “sit on” the other riders and prevent them from catching a wave, that rider will also lose priority. Prior to loosing priority a verbal warning will be issued to notify the rider with priority that they are close to turning over the priority.

5.6.14             The Head Judge may call priority interference

individually only if the majority of the judging panel does not see the incident.

5.6.15         If it is impossible to establish who has priority, no

priority will be given unless the bodyboarders in the heat, when asked, agree that only one has priority. If none agree, then no priority will be given and once the first wave from then on has been ridden, the remaining bodyboarders will get automatic priority for any other wave they choose and the heat will continue as normal.

5.6.16         In all cases where a dispute results from a

malfunction of the priority system, the APB Head Judge and Technical Director will arbitrate. It is always the surfers responsibility to continually check the priority system at all times for verification about allocation.

 

 

6.0        Miscellaneous

6.1      Death/Disablement

6.1.01                       Where a competitor or official suffers death or

disablement whilst competing or working at an APB event, the APB will follow specific protocols to:

  • Correctly inform the necessary authorities.
  • Postpone the event as appropriate.
  • Conduct an internal investigation into the

situation.

  • Communicate with and assist the immediate family of affected or deceased persons as appropriate.
  • Organise counseling for competitors and APB staff and their families as appropriate.

6.1.02             Officials and especially competitors are reminded that

circumstances surrounding travel to and from and participation in APB events can potentially expose them to hazardous situations that may result in accidental death or disablement and it is strongly recommended that correct insurance is obtained by the individual (see 1.10).

 

6.2      Code of Conduct – APB Event Staff

APB Event staff (includes volunteers):

6.2.01                        must behave honestly and with integrity in the course of their employment at APB events.

6.2.02             will maintain an appropriate duty of care and due

diligence in situations involving fellow staff, competitors and members of the public during the course of their employment at APB events.

6.2.03             will treat everyone involved in APB Events, (including

fellow staff, competitors and their associates, spectators and members of the general public) with respect and courtesy and without harassment, in the course of their employment at APB Events, and whilst representing the APB during the entire period of an APB event.

6.2.04             will comply with any laws, lawful direction or regulation given or applied by any National, State, Regional or Local Authority provided the power to enforce these, as they rightfully apply in the Country, Nation or Territory in which the event staff are conducting their official duties or representing the APB in relation to APB events.

6.2.05             will comply with any reasonable direction given by key

APB event staff (e.g., Technical Director, Head Judge, Tour Manager etc) who have the authority to give the direction in the course of their employment at APB events.

6.2.06                       must maintain appropriate confidentiality in respect of

matters the APB decides are to remain confidential (e.g., disclosing to another person the winners of a competition prior to the official announcement, disclosing matters in relation to judging decisions and outcomes, disciplinary reports and other internal APB matters that are not for disclosure to competitors of members of the public).

6.2.07                       must not use any “inside information”, their own status, power or authority as APB event staff to gain or seek to gain a benefit or advantage for themselves or another person.

6.2.08                       must not participate in gambling in relation to the outcome of any part of any APB events. Such violation by competitor or APB staff will result in 5 year ban from participation or employment with the APB.

6.2.09                       must acquire and/or use the resources financed within individual APB event budgets to deliver the planned APB event outcomes as specified (i.e., must not improperly use or take event finances, resources or sponsors products or take advantage of personal associations with sponsors for personal gain).

6.2.10             whilst conducting their official duties or whilst

representing the APB at APB events, behave in a manner that upholds the good reputation of the APB and in no way brings the APB into disrepute.

6.2.11                       Must not be under the influence of any narcotic drug or other banned substance whilst performing their official duties in the course of their employment at APB events.

6.3        Code of Conduct – APB Competitors

APB Competitors:

6.3.01                      must behave honestly and with integrity and in a manner befitting a professional sportsperson whilst at APB events.

6.3.02             will maintain an appropriate duty of care and due

diligence towards fellow competitors, event staff, and members of the public, throughout the entire period of any APB event in which they are or have been a competitor, whilst still being involved with an APB event.

6.3.03                       must treat everyone involved in APB Events, (including all event staff and officials, fellow competitors and their associates, spectators and members of the general public) with respect and courtesy and without harassment, throughout the entire APB event period.

6.3.04             will comply with any laws, lawful direction or regulation given or applied by any National, State, Regional or Local Authority provided the power to enforce these, as they rightfully apply in the Country, Nation or Territory in which the competitor is participating at APB events.

6.3.05                       must comply with any reasonable direction given by key APB event staff (e.g., Technical Director, Head Judge, Tour Manager, Beach Marshall, Announcer etc.) who has the authority to give such direction in the course of correctly managing the event as per the Rules stated in the Rule Book.

6.3.06                       must maintain appropriate confidentiality in respect of

matters the APB decides are to remain confidential (e.g., disclosing to another person the winners of a competition prior to the official announcement, disclosing matters in relation to judging decisions and outcomes, disciplinary reports and other internal APB matters that are not for disclosure to competitors or members of the public).

6.3.07                       must not use inside information, their own status, power or authority as APB event staff to gain or seek to gain a benefit or advantage for themselves or another person.

6.3.08             whilst competing in and representing the APB at APB

events, behave in a manner that upholds the good reputation of the APB and in no way brings the APB into disrepute.

6.3.09                       Must not be under the influence of any narcotic drug or other banned substance whilst competing at APB events or whilst representing the APB at APB events.

6.4      Disciplinary Committee

6.4.01             A committee has been established by the APB to

administer the policy in relation to Rules and Discipline. The committee consists of 2 members of the APB Board (the APB Technical Director, APB Tour Manager and one other person elected by the APB Board, who will serve as the APB Rules and Discipline Judge). The current Rules and Discipline Judge is Karl Gol.

6.5      Conduct in a Manner Befitting a

Professional Sportsperson

6.5.01         APB members, athletes competing in any APB Event,

judges, officials, and Event employees and volunteers must conduct themselves in a manner befitting a professional sportsperson, and are responsible for their actions before, during, and after competitions, while going to and from competitions, and while in geographic areas hosting competitions.

6.5.02             All athletes, judges, officials, and APB and Event

employees and volunteers are responsible for knowing and adhering to the Rules and particularly those in Sections 6.2 and 6.3 of the rule book.

6.5.03             Violation of APB Rules and/or unsportsmanlike

conduct may result in warnings, fines, suspension, or expulsion from the APB or APB Tour.

6.5.04             Sportsperson-like conduct is defined as, but not limited to:

 

  • respect for the APB tours and Event sponsors, APB staff, other competitors and members of the public;
  • respect for facilities, privileges and operational procedures at Event venues;
  • the use of courtesy and good manners at Event venues;
  • acting responsibly and maturely at Event venues;
  • refraining from the use of profane or abusive language at Event venues;
  • refraining from illegal (e.g., under age) or immoderate use of alcohol at Event venues; and
  • refraining from the use of illegal or banned drugs or prohibited substances during the Event period.

6.5.05         APB competitors and members, officials, and event staff are to conduct themselves in accordance with the best traditions of national and international sporting competition.

6.6      Misconduct and Disciplinary Action

6.6.01         APB members, athletes competing in any APB Event,

judges, officials, and Event employees and volunteers who violate the rules set out in this rule book, particularly those in relation to the codes of conduct (6.2 and 6.3) and whose behaviour brings the APB into disrepute will be subject to disciplinary action.

6.6.02             Disciplinary action may include verbal warnings, written warnings, monetary fines, automatic disqualification or expulsion from an event, loss of points and/or prizemoney, suspension from events or tours for a period of time and possible lifetime bans from APB events/tours.

6.6.03                       More than one form of disciplinary action may be imposed depending on the nature of the disciplinary violation committed. The APB Tour Manager, Event Director, Technical Director, APB Head Judge, APB International Judging Coordinator and the APB Rules and Discipline Judge can all impose disciplinary action and on the-spot fines of up to US$1000 and can also automatically disqualify/expel a competitor from an APB event, on-the-spot. Where possible the key APB event staff should consult with one another before a decision is reached regarding on-the-spot disqualification. Where fines above US$1000 or future bans from any APB competition or Tour would apply, a full investigation into the matter must be conducted by the APB Rules and Discipline Judge – on conclusion of the investigation they will present a report and recommendation to the other members of the APB Rules and Disciplinary Committee regarding the imposition of an appropriate penalty and if the majority agree it will be applied, unless total expulsion from the APB (lifetime ban) applies, in which case the decision to implement same must be ratified by the APB Board.

6.6.04             Monetary fines issued to competitors for infringements

and other violations are sought by two means, either separately or together.

6.6.05         “Restitution” is the first method used and refers to

payment for the offence from the benefit of prizemoney a competitor would normally have received from an event as may apply – where an infringement is issued prior to payment of any prizemoney to which the competitor was formerly entitled.

6.6.06         If restitution is not an option, “compensation” will be

sought (in instances where the competitor is not entitled to benefit from any prizemoney for the current event as it has already been issued, or where an amount for compensation above what would be gathered by restitution applies as a fine is in excess of any prizemoney owing).

6.6.07             Failure to pay any monetary fine in full before the

commencement of the next event will preclude the fined rider from competing in or gaining seeding for that event (and subsequent events, until the fine is paid).

6.6.08             Monetary fines levied on-the-spot are to be collected by the Technical Director or Head Judge and forwarded to the APB on event completion.

6.6.09          Verbal and written warnings where given to a competitor will be noted by the issuing APB Official and made known to the APB Rules and Discipline Judge post-event. Evidence of repeated breaches where warnings have been given to same rider over the course of one or more events may warrant further disciplinary action or a monetary fine being imposed in future where a warning might have applied. The Rules and Discipline Judge will alert APB event staff of any competitor who has already been warned on two separate occasions (for any infringement) that a fine will apply for the next infringement irrespective of whether or not a warning would normally have applied regarding such offence.

6.6.10             Appendix A has a list of applicable fines for various

infringements

 

 

 


 

 

Appendix A: List of applicable fines and penalties

Note: * indicates infringements for which possible suspension/ban from future competition could result.

 

Infringement Fine Payable to APB ($US)
Exceed maximum wave quota in a heat. $50 per wave
Riding waves in competition area during the previous of next heat. $50 per wave
Freesurfing in the competition area. $250 first offence

$500 second offence

$1000 third offence *

Competitor’s caddie rides a wave during a heat (fine levied on competitor). $250 per wave
Competitor’s caddie interferes with another rider in the competition area (fine levied on competitor). $250
Failure to wear competion vest correctly (includes correct wearing to and from marshalling area and whilst competing – each may be separately fined). $100 first offence

$200 second offence

$300 third offence

Failue to return competition vest within allocated time. $250
Competitor commences paddle out before signal is given to do so giving unfair advantage. $100 first offence

$200 second offence

$300 third offence

Competitor misses heat after check-in without satisfactory reason. $200
Competitor willfully fails to comply with a direction of Water patrol, Head Judge, Tour Manager or Announcer. $250 first offence

$500 second offence

$1000 third offence *

Competitor or their associate enters official’s area without permission (fine levied on competitor). $100 first offence

$200 second offence

$300 third offence

Failure to attend APB Media Conferences or mandatory APB event-related functions. $500 first offence

$1000 second offence *

Finalist fails to attend initial presentation ceremony at the event site without satisfactory reason. $1000
Automatic Top 16 exceeds maximum allowable Grand Slam or other event absence without satisfactory reason. $250 first offence

$500 second offence

+ loss of seeding privelages.

Failure to attend mandatory pre-event briefing $250
Competitor fails to return to shore after 2 interferences are called against them. $250
Loud use of foul language in the official’s area. $500 *
Verbally abusing event staff (with exception of judges or media) $250 first offence

$500 second offence

$1000 third offence *

Verbally abusing other competitors and members of the public whilst at the event site. $250 first offence

$500 second offence

$1000 third offence *

 

 

Infringement Fine Payable to APB ($US)
Verbally abusing/swearing/rudely gesturing at judges. $500 first offence

$1000 second offence

$2000 third offence *

Verbally abusing media. $1000 *
Entering the judge’s area to complain without prior authorization. $500 first offence

$1000 second offence

$2000 third offence *

Writing on, damaging or removing/disposing of judging sheets. $750
Abuse of own equipment at the Event Site $250 first offence

$500 second offence

$1000 third offence *

Wilfully damaging event property. $500 – $5000*
Wilfully damaging other property in the event locality. $500 – $5000*
Physically assaulting event staff including judges. $1000 – $5000 *
Physically assaulting another competitor at the event site. $1000 – $5000 *
Physically assaulting a media representative. $1000 – $5000 *
Conduct in a manner not befitting a professional sportsperson including where the image of the APB and of bodyboarding in general is brought into disrepute (for the whole period of the event, regardless of whether or not the competitor is present at the event site). $1000 first offence

$2000 second offence

$3000 third offence *

Involvement in collusion/result fixing or betting in relation to competition outcome. $1000 – $5000 *
World Champion fails to attend remaining Tour events after winning title.

—————————————————————–

Contracted competitor breaks riders contracts

$5000

 

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$500 and 12 month ban